Blank tapes for Akai CR-80-D-SS

Help Support QuadraphonicQuad:

Ventures

Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2008
Messages
45
Location
Alberta, Canada
I second Ventures, you can drill out a standard 8 track tape to create a notch that will trick 8 track players, as i had to transfer a quad tape recording when I damaged a quad case beyond repair- the only way to transfer the tape portion was to use a spare stereo tape

if you do use a stereo tape- how do you change it to 2 programs(4-channel) if its designed for 4 programs (2-channel) sound? hopefully that made sense
I was wondering that myself.

By the way, I made my quad notches with the help of a soldering gun and a little sanding after things cooled.
 

8trackman

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2010
Messages
212
heres are the results- as you can see it is possible to make a quad-tape out of a stereo tape- and its possible to move labels too





 

8trackman

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2010
Messages
212
I think I did that tape! LoL! Is this Colin in Ontario??
lol yes it is great to hear from you again-glad you have found the forum, ...it is working beautifully......sorry for taking credit for your work

to everyone on the forum Chris does great work+ and he is very knowledgeable
 

Ventures

Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2008
Messages
45
Location
Alberta, Canada
lol yes it is great to hear from you again-glad you have found the forum, ...it is working beautifully......sorry for taking credit for your work

to everyone on the forum Chris does great work+ and he is very knowledgeable
I didn't interpret it that way, Colin! All's good and thanks for the props!(y)
 

mlrocker

500 Club - QQ All-Star
QQ Supporter
Joined
Jul 2, 2016
Messages
549
Location
Daytona Beach Fl
5 years later....

What are the dimensions of that notch? can anybody measure their Q8 for me?
I would like to try this.
 

furui_suterioo

400 Club - QQ All-Star
Joined
Sep 5, 2018
Messages
452
Location
kgLoks Agenjegleks, gCagliforgnjiga
I know this is old, I don't like starting new threads.
Anyone have trouble with Ampex blank 8-track carts(silver & purple sleeve 8T-84)?
So far I have had to wind every single one of them all the way through by hand before they will turn freely(lots of fun). The tape "chirps" as it comes out of the reel for the first time(in decades). I've heard about Ampex open reel tape going bad but didn't think about 8-track. The Ampex carts still sound surprisingly good after this tedious process, I've got a half dozen more of them sealed.
 
Last edited:

doity

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2014
Messages
270
Not sure but from what I have read on this thread the Akai has the manual 2/4 switch like the Technics? Well if that was the case what was the purpose of the Convertaquad blanks? To convert money from the consumer to the manufacturer? Anyway, I just bought 4 sealed BASF Studio Series tapes and of the 2 that I have opened and used the pads were intact as well as the splices. And yes I ran both of them through first but I am really impressed by how well they have held up. And the splices have not only held up, but look very secure with no sign of separation in the near future. The opposite case from the Convertaquad’s which had both bad splices and pads.
 

furui_suterioo

400 Club - QQ All-Star
Joined
Sep 5, 2018
Messages
452
Location
kgLoks Agenjegleks, gCagliforgnjiga
Not sure but from what I have read on this thread the Akai has the manual 2/4 switch like the Technics? Well if that was the case what was the purpose of the Convertaquad blanks? To convert money from the consumer to the manufacturer? Anyway, I just bought 4 sealed BASF Studio Series tapes and of the 2 that I have opened and used the pads were intact as well as the splices. And yes I ran both of them through first but I am really impressed by how well they have held up. And the splices have not only held up, but look very secure with no sign of separation in the near future. The opposite case from the Convertaquad’s which had both bad splices and pads.
I've also had the same thought about the market for blank quad cartridges. I suppose the idea was to play them in your Q8 car player, which would've needed the the notch(and assuming that you also have a Q8 recorder). I've replaced the pads/splices on almost all of mine just in case, very few still had good pads. There was one Maxell tape where the reel looked like it had exploded inside the cart, I dumped it all out into a bag and re spooled back onto the cart, it was crazy.
 

furui_suterioo

400 Club - QQ All-Star
Joined
Sep 5, 2018
Messages
452
Location
kgLoks Agenjegleks, gCagliforgnjiga
I've recorded about 20 tapes now on the Akai, dusting off the head with a q-tip between tapes. It's still working great so far and I want to keep it that way. So I got this Nortronics demagnetizer but it has no instructions. Could someone tell me how to use it and how often?
I'm still new to the wonderful world of 8-track so I would really appreciate the advice.
20210329_135216.jpg

Also, has anyone tried/would trust these head cleaning fluids on Akai tape head?
 

quadsearcher

900 Club - QQ All-Star
Joined
Nov 8, 2010
Messages
939
This is exactly how I've always done it: (found at Cleaning and Demagnetizing ) The tip about molasses in January is good.
Also, it is a good idea to have some alcohol on the qtip , not just dusting the head. There is 99% iso alcohol available, just hard to find locally sometimes. Pharmacies used to carry it, some still might, or else online ordering. I got a gallon from a hardware store to last the next 20 years.
I know it is tough to clean the head if the cabinet is on, I have an Akai, a demagnetized larger needlenose pliers is good to hold a long wooden swab. (It can be difficult to demag pliers without a good demag, check first to see if they pick up small ferrous parts) When I got my CR80 there was so much (invisible to the naked eye) oxide stuck on there that it made static and other noise on some channels and I had to buff it.

"The demagnetizer must be turned on at least 3 feet from any tape or tape machine. The active end of the demagnetizer should be covered with plastic so as not to scratch. If it has a bare metal end, cover it with a layer of tape. The magnetic field of the demagnetizer drops off rapidly with distance. In order to demagnetize a part you must apply a field that is strong enough to totally magnetize the part. Since the demagnetizer is running on 60 Hz AC, the polarity of the magnetic field is reversing 120 times a second. If the power were to go off while the demagnetizer was close to something, there would be a very good chance the part would wind up strongly magnetized. In order to DEmagnetize something, the field must be very slowly be reduced in strength to close to zero. We do this by slowly moving the demagnetizer away from what we are trying to demagnetize. Fast or jerky motions can result in magnetizing not DEmagnetizing. Move like you are in molasses in January.

So the steps are:

1) Turn the power off on the tape recorder or duplicator. Demagnetizing with the power on can damage the circuitry.
2) Turn the demagnetizer on well away from tape or tape machines (3' or greater).
3) Move the demagnetizer in so the tip contacts the parts of the tape recorder or duplicator you are trying to demagnetize. You want to do the head(s), guides, and (if you have a strong enough demagnetizer) the capstan.
4) Move across the surface of each part and from one part to the next very slowly and smoothly. If you slip and move fast, go back over that part.
5) After you have gone over the surface of every metal part in the tape path, very slowly and smoothly move the demagnetizer away until you are at least 3' away.
6) Turn the demagnetizer off.

Some additional notes:

If you use a low power demagnetizer like RS sold, you probably do not have to power to be able to demagnetize a capstan.

It is not important to move slowly when moving TOWARDS the tape heads, only when near them and when moving AWAY from them.

You need to get the strongest possible magnetic field applied to the metal tape path parts you are trying to demagnetize. This requires that you get the end of the demagnetizer into contact with the parts, since the magnetic field drops off rapidly with distance. This is why we want plastic or tape over the metal end of the demagnetizer, so we do not scratch anything with it.

You do not need to hold the demagnetizer in position for any amount of time. All you need to do is:

1) get a strong enough alternating magnetic field
2) reduce that field strength slowly.

Pulling away slowly and smoothly is very important. You want to demagnetize not only the tape head(s), but all metal parts that touch the tape.

The only way you can damage things while demagnetizing would be to do it with the equipment power turned on, to kill the power while the demagnetizer is close to the equipment, or to move fast or jerky."

Edit: I only trust 99% Isopropyl Alcohol.
 

furui_suterioo

400 Club - QQ All-Star
Joined
Sep 5, 2018
Messages
452
Location
kgLoks Agenjegleks, gCagliforgnjiga
This is exactly how I've always done it: (found at Cleaning and Demagnetizing ) The tip about molasses in January is good.
Also, it is a good idea to have some alcohol on the qtip , not just dusting the head. There is 99% iso alcohol available, just hard to find locally sometimes. Pharmacies used to carry it, some still might, or else online ordering. I got a gallon from a hardware store to last the next 20 years.
I know it is tough to clean the head if the cabinet is on, I have an Akai, a demagnetized larger needlenose pliers is good to hold a long wooden swab. (It can be difficult to demag pliers without a good demag, check first to see if they pick up small ferrous parts) When I got my CR80 there was so much (invisible to the naked eye) oxide stuck on there that it made static and other noise on some channels and I had to buff it.

"The demagnetizer must be turned on at least 3 feet from any tape or tape machine. The active end of the demagnetizer should be covered with plastic so as not to scratch. If it has a bare metal end, cover it with a layer of tape. The magnetic field of the demagnetizer drops off rapidly with distance. In order to demagnetize a part you must apply a field that is strong enough to totally magnetize the part. Since the demagnetizer is running on 60 Hz AC, the polarity of the magnetic field is reversing 120 times a second. If the power were to go off while the demagnetizer was close to something, there would be a very good chance the part would wind up strongly magnetized. In order to DEmagnetize something, the field must be very slowly be reduced in strength to close to zero. We do this by slowly moving the demagnetizer away from what we are trying to demagnetize. Fast or jerky motions can result in magnetizing not DEmagnetizing. Move like you are in molasses in January.

So the steps are:

1) Turn the power off on the tape recorder or duplicator. Demagnetizing with the power on can damage the circuitry.
2) Turn the demagnetizer on well away from tape or tape machines (3' or greater).
3) Move the demagnetizer in so the tip contacts the parts of the tape recorder or duplicator you are trying to demagnetize. You want to do the head(s), guides, and (if you have a strong enough demagnetizer) the capstan.
4) Move across the surface of each part and from one part to the next very slowly and smoothly. If you slip and move fast, go back over that part.
5) After you have gone over the surface of every metal part in the tape path, very slowly and smoothly move the demagnetizer away until you are at least 3' away.
6) Turn the demagnetizer off.

Some additional notes:

If you use a low power demagnetizer like RS sold, you probably do not have to power to be able to demagnetize a capstan.

It is not important to move slowly when moving TOWARDS the tape heads, only when near them and when moving AWAY from them.

You need to get the strongest possible magnetic field applied to the metal tape path parts you are trying to demagnetize. This requires that you get the end of the demagnetizer into contact with the parts, since the magnetic field drops off rapidly with distance. This is why we want plastic or tape over the metal end of the demagnetizer, so we do not scratch anything with it.

You do not need to hold the demagnetizer in position for any amount of time. All you need to do is:

1) get a strong enough alternating magnetic field
2) reduce that field strength slowly.

Pulling away slowly and smoothly is very important. You want to demagnetize not only the tape head(s), but all metal parts that touch the tape.

The only way you can damage things while demagnetizing would be to do it with the equipment power turned on, to kill the power while the demagnetizer is close to the equipment, or to move fast or jerky."

Edit: I only trust 99% Isopropyl Alcohol.
Thanks, I was getting some slightly conflicting results from searching online so I appreciate hearing from owners of these machines.
 
Top