Extracting DTS 96/24

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ArmyOfQuad

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Is there a way to properly extract dts 96/24 to a 96 kHz .wav file? When I extract it using dvd audio extractor, it gives me a 48 kHz file. I'm not completely sure how dts 96/24 works, but I guess it's based off of a 48 kHz file for backwards compatibility, so I'm not sure if I'm getting the best extraction, should I be able to get a 96 kHz file if something were properly extracting it and decoding the format?
 

sukothai

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Using AudioMuxer, I had to have the correct ArcSoft DTS decoder installed to get 96/24. With the default install it would revert to the core DTS stream; which is 48. If I remember correctly, DVD Audio Extractor doesn't support 96.

I just did a test and was able to extract the DTS stream with DVD Audio Extractor using the "Direct Stream Demux" method. This creates a .dts file; which you can then convert to a 96K .wav with AudioMuxer (if you have the correct ArcSoft DTS decoder installed.)
 

ArmyOfQuad

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Yes, I talked to the audiomuxer guy, and he was also able to point me in the direction of the correct ArcSoft decoder.

h**p://www.sendspace.com/file/ief0t0 (replace ** with tt)

He suggested to me extracting all files to the "c:\windows\syswow64" folder (64 bit windows) or "c:\windows\system32" folder (32 bit windows), and then register the decoder, by running the install.bat file. I did this on my 64 bit windows 7 install, and it worked perfectly, it registered the file, and when I used audiomuxer, it decoded to 96 kHz.

Also, audiomuxer can extract the .dts file from the dvd, so you can do the entire process with audiomuxer, it really is a great program, and I'm finding some programs I used to use I no longer need now.
 

LizardKing

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As I don't have a DTS/96/24 capable playback system, using this method I can now listen to DTS 96/24 converted to 96/24 LPCM. (y)

Bit of a pain to re-author though...
 

The Bright Side

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Hey Armyofquad, have you tried xrecode? It's at http://www.xrecode.com/. I don't know if that's exactly what you're looking for, but you may want to give it a spin. It's a swiss army knife and has done some really valuable jobs for me.
 

Highas Akite

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Using AudioMuxer, I had to have the correct ArcSoft DTS decoder installed to get 96/24. With the default install it would revert to the core DTS stream; which is 48. If I remember correctly, DVD Audio Extractor doesn't support 96.

I just did a test and was able to extract the DTS stream with DVD Audio Extractor using the "Direct Stream Demux" method. This creates a .dts file; which you can then convert to a 96K .wav with AudioMuxer (if you have the correct ArcSoft DTS decoder installed.)
I have the exact same problem as OP and I even did what he did and correctly installed the Arcsoft DTS Decoder with the link he posted and followed his instructions but it still won't extract the 24/96 stream. I even did the DTS check in the settings and it says the Arcsoft and the Surcode decoder are installed and the boxes are checked.

I also tried to just extract the dts files using Audiomuxer and DVD Audio Extractor like you did. Neither were 96 and when I tried to convert the ones I did with DVDAE, it wouldn't even recongnize the files. I think its because it demuxes them to .dts and not .dtshd. Any idea whats going on?
 

LizardKing

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I have the exact same problem as OP and I even did what he did and correctly installed the Arcsoft DTS Decoder with the link he posted and followed his instructions but it still won't extract the 24/96 stream. I even did the DTS check in the settings and it says the Arcsoft and the Surcode decoder are installed and the boxes are checked.

I also tried to just extract the dts files using Audiomuxer and DVD Audio Extractor like you did. Neither were 96 and when I tried to convert the ones I did with DVDAE, it wouldn't even recongnize the files. I think its because it demuxes them to .dts and not .dtshd. Any idea whats going on?
It worked for me following ArmyofQuad's instructions above.

One question are you talking about dta 96/24 or DTS-HD MA at 96/24?? DTS 96/24 files will have a .dts extension not .dtshd..

If you try and convert the .dts file to a .wav does it come out at 48Khz or 96kHz? If it converts to a 96/24 wav file then the Arcsoft decoder has done it jop properly..

At least that my understanding...
 

neil wilkes

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The DTS-HD StreamPlayer will also decode back to PCM.
You must rename a .dts file to .cpt though, but .dtshd files get converted easily.
 

Miilda

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I'm solving another problem. Audio Muxer can work with DTS, it can convert files to DTS and DTS HD, but it cannot convert 96/24 files to DTS 96/24. He will only convert everything to DTS 48/24. This means that AudioMuxer cannot convert to DTS 96/24. The same problem has the Xrecode program, which also does not convert to DTS 96/24, but only to DTS 48/24. Is there any other program that can easily convert to DTS 96/24 without having to use DTS HD Master Audio Suite to produce DTS 96/24 files?
 

jimfisheye

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Trash that old Arcsoft cludge! It's in ffmpeg now. :)

DVD Audio Extractor to .dts files (no decode!! - DVDAE only decodes the core dts)
ffmpeg .dts to .flac
You get the full decode.
 

Owen Smith

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This is all caused because on the DVD it is encoded as DTS 48 core for compatibility with older AV amps and players, and then some extension packets that contain the extra information to add to the DTS core to make it 24/96. Older AV amps and decoders in players just ignore the extension packets.

DTS ES 6.1 Discrete was done in the same way, a DTS 48 core containing 5.1 and then extension packets that add the extra rear centre channel and tell the decoder what to subtract from the left rear and right rear to take that information out.

Even DTS HD MA is done this way on Blu Ray. The DTS 48 core is there as ever for older AV amps, and then a lot of extension packets to add to get that to lossless and whatever sample rate and bit depth the DTS HD MA is using.
 

boondocks

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Yes. The whole DTS format/variations/packet thing gets confusing (to me).
Owen, you obviously have a better understanding than I. đź‘Ť
 

Owen Smith

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Yes. The whole DTS format/variations/packet thing gets confusing (to me).
Owen, you obviously have a better understanding than I. đź‘Ť
I'm a software engineer by profession. The DTS core plus extensions scheme makes total sense to me, it's how I'd have designed and implemented it. The core runs at 1.5mbits per second so occupies quite a lot of space on the disc. You don't want to have to duplicate that information and use more space, for example if you had separate DTS HD MA and DTS core streams on Blu Ray.

Note Dolby Digital and Dolby True HD on Blu Ray are completely separate streams, the one does not build on the other. This also makes sense because the Dolby Digital bit rate is so low (448kbps) it occupies only a third of the space of DTS core and there isn't enough value in re-using that. Plus Dolby True HD is DVD-A MLP encoding with a new name and some metadata, and it wasn't designed to use Dolby Digital as a core stream.
 

boondocks

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I'm a software engineer by profession. The DTS core plus extensions scheme makes total sense to me, it's how I'd have designed and implemented it. The core runs at 1.5mbits per second so occupies quite a lot of space on the disc. You don't want to have to duplicate that information and use more space, for example if you had separate DTS HD MA and DTS core streams on Blu Ray.

Note Dolby Digital and Dolby True HD on Blu Ray are completely separate streams, the one does not build on the other. This also makes sense because the Dolby Digital bit rate is so low (448kbps) it occupies only a third of the space of DTS core and there isn't enough value in re-using that. Plus Dolby True HD is DVD-A MLP encoding with a new name and some metadata, and it wasn't designed to use Dolby Digital as a core stream.
Makes sense. I did know True HD was recycled MLP made all bright and shiny.
See this is the difference between an understandable simple explanation and the overly technical verbage I read recently. I mean, I'm far from being a MENSA candidate, but I have a decent enough IQ.
I once worked in R&D where I had to wade through technical papers, and patents, and truth is many of them were written poorly or deliberately obfuscated. IIRC I'm listed on at least 3 patents relating to metal hydride batteries but thankfully the engineer wrote the applications. At the time Japanese interests were flooding the European patent system and we were just staking out some ground.
LOL my first two weeks in R & D I did nothing but read the Phillips papers on AB5 metal hydride alloys. All new jargon and many paragraphs read and re-read. This was early internet days and Google wasn't much help with anything.
Nowadays perhaps I'm just getting lazy.

In any event, thanks for breaking it down for me, Owen. You always make good points and I appreciate your take on things.
 
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