How are you ripping your ATMOS Blu Rays?

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coolerking101

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I'm curious as to what everyone here prefers to use to rip their ATMOS blu-rays via PC? I recently ripped my Air/Moon Safari Blu Ray using MakeMKV and then Music Media Helper (to convert to FLAC) and it did not turn out well when playing through JRiver. Some of the overhead Atmos tracks did not translate properly. JRiver detects 8 channels but is not outputting some of the rear/overhead tracks properly.

I own DVD Audio Extractor, but that does not appear to work with the copy protection on the newer blu rays.

If anyone has an all-in-one solution, please let me know, but I'll settle for something that simply works properly. TIA!
 
To hear ripped Atmos titles properly, converting to Flac does not work. Flac is the issue. If you have the original .mkv file, open it in a media player and listen that way. That is, if your PC is connected to your AVR.
 
To hear ripped Atmos titles properly, converting to Flac does not work. Flac is the issue. If you have the original .mkv file, open it in a media player and listen that way. That is, if your PC is connected to your AVR.
Well that's an easy fix! So just rip ATMOS track to MKV moving fwd and play them as is (bistreamed to my AVR). Thanks!
 
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With regard to ripping, my workflow is as follows: -

* I use MakeMKV's 'back-up' option to back-up the blu-ray disc
* Imgburn to create an .iso image file of the blu-ray disc back-up.
* I load the .iso image file back into MakeMKV to create .mkv files for each audio stream format.
* I then use MKVtoolnixGUI to remove the video stream from the .mkv file and create an .mka file for each audio format.
* To finish I load each .mka into MP3tag to tidy up the files meta-data and add an album cover image.

Sometimes I might use other applications to extract the audio streams I require, including the Atmos stream.

Personally, I don't create separate tracks, I create a .cue navigation file instead or utilise the chapters within the .mka file ;)
 
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In my opinion, the best workflow is:
1) Rip the Blu-ray disc using MakeMkv
2) Split and convert the *.mkv file containing the atmos tracks into individual *m4a files that Kodi can playback using Music Media Helper.

If the album requires gapless playback, the workflow is slightly longer:
1) Rip the Blu-ray disc using MakeMkv
2) Create a cue sheet using Music Media Helper (the latest version that uses frames instead of milliseconds)
3) Convert the *mkv file into a *.mka file using MKVToolNix (remove all chapters and the video from the file)
4) Upload into a single folder the *.mka file and the cue sheet (remember to update the path name to reflect the mka format)
5) Add artwork in the format "folder.jpg"

Obviously, you can playback the *.mkv file directly, but this process doesn't allow you to use a media player like Kodi in the best possible way (and without video).
 
Thank you for all the replies. So I take it there is no current, all-in-one workaround for gapless playback, like using a single program such as DVD Audio Extractor for older blu rays?
 
In my opinion, the best workflow is:
1) Rip the Blu-ray disc using MakeMkv
2) Split and convert the *.mkv file containing the atmos tracks into individual *m4a files that Kodi can playback using Music Media Helper.

If the album requires gapless playback, the workflow is slightly longer:
1) Rip the Blu-ray disc using MakeMkv
2) Create a cue sheet using Music Media Helper (the latest version that uses frames instead of milliseconds)
3) Convert the *mkv file into a *.mka file using MKVToolNix (remove all chapters and the video from the file)
4) Upload into a single folder the *.mka file and the cue sheet (remember to update the path name to reflect the mka format)
5) Add artwork in the format "folder.jpg"

Obviously, you can playback the *.mkv file directly, but this process doesn't allow you to use a media player like Kodi in the best possible way (and without video).
A few questions:

In your first method, am I to understand that unlike converting MKV to FLAC, converting to MKV to M4A files will preserve the Atmos info perfectly?

As to your second method, I assume this creates one, album length file, which would prevent you from finding individual tracks?
 
I'm curious as to what everyone here prefers to use to rip their ATMOS blu-rays via PC? I recently ripped my Air/Moon Safari Blu Ray using MakeMKV and then Music Media Helper (to convert to FLAC) and it did not turn out well when playing through JRiver. Some of the overhead Atmos tracks did not translate properly. JRiver detects 8 channels but is not outputting some of the rear/overhead tracks properly.

I own DVD Audio Extractor, but that does not appear to work with the copy protection on the newer blu rays.

If anyone has an all-in-one solution, please let me know, but I'll settle for something that simply works properly. TIA!

DVD Audio Extractor works if you use AnyDVD HD instead of MakeMKV (since you are having issues using it). I am just ripping the audio not the video. And of course it will rip only to FLAC or WAV and is limited to ripping to 8 (7.1) channels, so if you rip Atmos it will rip it as 7.1.
 
As others have mentioned above, I also rip the discs to a big MKV file using MakeMKV. And then I use MKV Toolnix to strip out the video and split the big file into chapters (songs.) The resulting MKA audio files are much smaller than MKV files and I play them via my Oppo 205 as music files just as I would with flac.
 
I'm curious as to what everyone here prefers to use to rip their ATMOS blu-rays via PC? I recently ripped my Air/Moon Safari Blu Ray using MakeMKV and then Music Media Helper (to convert to FLAC) and it did not turn out well when playing through JRiver. Some of the overhead Atmos tracks did not translate properly. JRiver detects 8 channels but is not outputting some of the rear/overhead tracks properly.

I own DVD Audio Extractor, but that does not appear to work with the copy protection on the newer blu rays.

If anyone has an all-in-one solution, please let me know, but I'll settle for something that simply works properly. TIA!
FYI, use wavpack at the end. FLAC only supports 8 channels.

Rip BD to .mkv with MakeMKV
Rip .thd Atmos stream from .mkv with Inviska MKV Extract
Rename .thd to .mlp
Play with Dolby Reference Player
Eventually roll into DAW app to capture as audio wav and then export to wavpack for more convenient media player listening. (eg. Using something like VOX music player.)

Dolby Reference Player is the only software on the planet that can play Atmos files. "Ripping" from it is a real time transfer. That Inviska app looks like someone's home brew work. At the time, mkvtoolnix didn't seem to be able to do this though.

There might be more convenient apps by now? Probably not though. Dolby Reference Player is still the only player and Dolby does NOT want to sell this commercially or even make it available to anyone but their vetted corporate partners. This is the main app you need to find some other way.

Garry's media tools thing looks fantastic in many ways but... For me it would mean making a Windows install (all the DIY to make it work and locking it down) and booting into it for file curating and then back... which I'm still entertaining. All of the audio stuff from media players to DAW and production are Mac here. And also the dirty little secret with the media helper tools is you still need to install the official Dolby Reference Player app. It's more of a script that calls existing apps. That means finding a Windows version of said reference player app for this scenario too.

Note: Don't split the mkv file into chapters first! The result split .mlp files get corrupted about half the time with this. It's either not allowed or there isn't a tool available to do it correctly. Keep the single file. Split your wavpack files at the end.
 
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FYI, use wavpack at the end. FLAC only supports 8 channels.

Rip BD to .mkv with MakeMKV
Rip .thd Atmos stream from .mkv with Inviska MKV Extract
Rename .thd to .mlp
Play with Dolby Reference Player
Eventually roll into DAW app to capture as audio wav and then export to wavpack for more convenient media player listening. (eg. Using something like VOX music player.)

Dolby Reference Player is the only software on the planet that can play Atmos files. "Ripping" from it is a real time transfer. That Inviska app looks like someone's home brew work. At the time, mkvtoolnix didn't seem to be able to do this though.

There might be more convenient apps by now? Probably not though. Dolby Reference Player is still the only player and Dolby does NOT want to sell this commercially or even make it available to anyone but their vetted corporate partners. This is the main app you need to find some other way.

Garry's media tools thing looks fantastic in many ways but... For me it would mean making a Windows install (all the DIY to make it work and locking it down) and booting into it for file curating and then back... which I'm still entertaining. All of the audio stuff from media players to DAW and production are Mac here. And also the dirty little secret with the media helper tools is you still need to install the official Dolby Reference Player app. It's more of a script that calls existing apps. That means finding a Windows version of said reference player app for this scenario too.

Note: Don't split the mkv file into chapters first! The result split .mlp files get corrupted about half the time with this. It's either not allowed or there isn't a tool available to do it correctly. Keep the single file. Split your wavpack files at the end.
I believe you can use other media players, but only if you bitstream to your AVR so that it can process ATMOS. If I’m wrong about that, someone feel free to correct me.
 
I believe you can use other media players, but only if you bitstream to your AVR so that it can process ATMOS. If I’m wrong about that, someone feel free to correct me.
The only way to use ANY other media player is to do what's called "pass through mode" where it sends the encoded signal out. You MUST connect to a AV receiver with the hardware Atmos decoder built in. It's passing the encoded signal to a hardware decoder (you have to purchase). Not decoding it!

Dolby Reference Player is truly the only software on the planet that will DECODE and play Atmos files. Dolby is keeping this out of commercial software media at present to force hardware sales.

Choose your adventure here!
Decoding to standard audio with the computer like normal (for decades now) vs. trusting a hardware purchase with hidden software inside that you have no way to manage and a rogue firmware update could disable. And with all the software spoofing going on where "preferred" devices are white listed and features are disabled for others. Apple went scorched earth on this. If you don't have an Apple TV or an AVR on the white list, even pass through is disabled!
 
And then I use MKV Toolnix to strip out the video and split the big file into chapters (songs.) The resulting MKA audio files are much smaller than MKV files and I play them via my Oppo 205 as music files just as I would with flac.

If you use MMH you can split the MKV rip directly to mka files and get the files renamed/tagged by looking the album up with the MMH MusicBrainz tool included in the tool used to split. That also can create JRiver sidecar xml files so the mka files are loaded into JRiver with metadata. No need to enter any data except the Artist and Album names.
 
If you use MMH you can split the MKV rip directly to mka files and get the files renamed/tagged by looking the album up with the MMH MusicBrainz tool included in the tool used to split. That also can create JRiver sidecar xml files so the mka files are loaded into JRiver with metadata. No need to enter any data except the Artist and Album names.
I highly recommend Garry's (Homer's) method. I spent weeks figuring this out and Garry was kind enough to help me every step of the way. It was even more confusing because I'm on a Mac, but Parallels software was my salvation, as now I can use MMH. As I am also using JRiver, here's my fairly straightforward method:

- Copy/Decrypt the entire disc using MakeMKV
- Open decrypted folder in MakeMKV, deselect every section but the one containing the TrueHD stream. Within that one section, deselect everything (video, DD, etc) but the TrueHD stream. Hit "Make MKV".
- Put the resulting .mkv file in a folder named for the album (however your files are organized in your library). Download cover art for the album in jpg format. Add this to the same folder, and change the name of the jpg to wither "cover.jpg" or "folder.jpg".
- In MMH select "Extract Audio from MKV" and select the .mkv folder. It will break it up into individual .mka files. Select "Get Tags from MusicBrainz" to tag these files. Select "Copy Tags". Under "Album Art", hit the top button "Find Art" and select the jpg. Hit "Tag and Rename".
- Toss the big .mkv file. Add the folder containing all the .mka's and sidecar files to JRiver.

Voila! You've now got full lossless Atmos files added to your library. I play these over DLNA by sending them from JRiver to my Oppo 205, which sends the signal to my Pre/Pro via Bitstream so the Pre/Pro is doing the decoding. I can't tell you the satisfaction I get every time I see the Pre/Pro display ATMOS when I play one of these files.

Hope this helps and good luck!
 
I highly recommend Garry's (Homer's) method. I spent weeks figuring this out and Garry was kind enough to help me every step of the way. It was even more confusing because I'm on a Mac, but Parallels software was my salvation, as now I can use MMH. As I am also using JRiver, here's my fairly straightforward method:

- Copy/Decrypt the entire disc using MakeMKV
- Open decrypted folder in MakeMKV, deselect every section but the one containing the TrueHD stream. Within that one section, deselect everything (video, DD, etc) but the TrueHD stream. Hit "Make MKV".
- Put the resulting .mkv file in a folder named for the album (however your files are organized in your library). Download cover art for the album in jpg format. Add this to the same folder, and change the name of the jpg to wither "cover.jpg" or "folder.jpg".
- In MMH select "Extract Audio from MKV" and select the .mkv folder. It will break it up into individual .mka files. Select "Get Tags from MusicBrainz" to tag these files. Select "Copy Tags". Under "Album Art", hit the top button "Find Art" and select the jpg. Hit "Tag and Rename".
- Toss the big .mkv file. Add the folder containing all the .mka's and sidecar files to JRiver.

Voila! You've now got full lossless Atmos files added to your library. I play these over DLNA by sending them from JRiver to my Oppo 205, which sends the signal to my Pre/Pro via Bitstream so the Pre/Pro is doing the decoding. I can't tell you the satisfaction I get every time I see the Pre/Pro display ATMOS when I play one of these files.

Hope this helps and good luck!
Does this give you gapless playback?
 
Does this give you gapless playback?
Unfortunately no. For the few albums that require gapless (Abbey Road, DSOTM), I add the full .mkv to JRiver. Unfortunately this is considered VIDEO, and I haven't been able to properly integrate it into my library with proper tags. I also haven't gotten a .cue file to play nicely and give me chapter access.
 
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