How Many Have Tinnitus?

QuadraphonicQuad

Help Support QuadraphonicQuad:

halbroome

1K Club - QQ Shooting Star
QQ Supporter
Joined
May 12, 2017
Messages
1,363
Location
Center of Sound Field
Curious on the numbers here: how many have their worst ear as the side they sleep on? I sleep on my right side, and that is certainly the ear I have the most trouble with. My dad suggested there might be a pattern there, but I can't sleep on my other side to test it (besides, who want TWO bad ears?).
 

CINERAMAX

400 Club - QQ All-Star
Joined
Jan 12, 2017
Messages
462
A hazard of my profession, Home Theaters. HBP and diabetes can make it worse: Ie. Pulsatile Tinnitus, that is reversible.
 

CINERAMAX

400 Club - QQ All-Star
Joined
Jan 12, 2017
Messages
462
Curious on the numbers here: how many have their worst ear as the side they sleep on? I sleep on my right side, and that is certainly the ear I have the most trouble with. My dad suggested there might be a pattern there, but I can't sleep on my other side to test it (besides, who want TWO bad ears?).
My bad one is opposite the side I sleep on, walked by a giant subwoofer in a disco once, bass frequencies sensitivity were busted in just that ear since..
 

cbmmm3

1K Club - QQ Shooting Star
QQ Supporter
Joined
Apr 2, 2011
Messages
1,884
Location
West Carlisle Michigan
Molly Hatchet. 1979. 1200 seat theater. THE loudest concert I have ever been to. And Ive been to many many many. My ears were ringing for a week. Hell they were prolly bleeding for a few days !!
But - as stated in my post #89 - it took bodily injury to trigger my tinny.
 

MidiMagic

1K Club - QQ Shooting Star
Joined
Jul 5, 2010
Messages
1,451
What really happens:

Sound loud enough to damage the basilar membrane in the cochlea causes tinnitus.

The cochlea is actually a mechanical analog of a Fourier Transform converting a waveform into a histogram of frequencies. A graphic display of frequency response works the same way.

Each sensory cell on the basilar membrane responds to a certain frequency. If one is damaged, it can either stop working or give a permanent signal of that frequency. That signal is one of a sine wave tone.

They used to think old age caused hearing loss. Now we know that most people in the early 20th century lost hearing from working in factories, exposure to close gunfire, and riding steam trains.
 

Owen Smith

701 Club - QQ All-Star
Joined
Apr 6, 2012
Messages
732
Location
UK
The cochlea is actually a mechanical analog of a Fourier Transform converting a waveform into a histogram of frequencies. A graphic display of frequency response works the same way.

Each sensory cell on the basilar membrane responds to a certain frequency.

I knew that is how the ear works, but I have never seen it described so succinctly and clearly. I suppose the explanation is normally long winded because most people don't know what a Fourier Transform is.
If one is damaged, it can either stop working or give a permanent signal of that frequency. That signal is one of a sine wave tone.

They used to think old age caused hearing loss. Now we know that most people in the early 20th century lost hearing from working in factories, exposure to close gunfire, and riding steam trains.

My grandad worked in incredibly noisy factories all his adult life, working on steam locomotive boilers before and during WWII (hammering down boiler tube ends) and then he worked at British Ropes making wire rope for suspension bridges. He always used to say all his old work mates were completely deaf and he had no idea why it hadn't happened to him. Then at 87 the asbestos from the steam loco boilers caught up with him and killed him. But he lived considerably longer than all his contemporaries so he didn't do too badly.
 

jimfisheye

2K Club - QQ Super Nova
Joined
Jan 8, 2010
Messages
2,496
What really happens:

...

The cochlea is actually a mechanical analog of a Fourier Transform converting a waveform into a histogram of frequencies. A graphic display of frequency response works the same way.

Each sensory cell on the basilar membrane responds to a certain frequency. If one is damaged, it can either stop working or give a permanent signal of that frequency. That signal is one of a sine wave tone.
Yeah it turns out that our hearing is more akin to a digital system. :D

And that gets filtered by perception. A first reflection component isn't that much extra sound pressure but it makes a primary sound perceived as twice as loud. Highs and lows are distance cues. Anything even slightly louder sounds "better".
 

Sal1950

1K Club - QQ Shooting Star
QQ Supporter
Joined
Jan 3, 2020
Messages
1,435
Location
Central FL
Then at 87 the asbestos from the steam loco boilers caught up with him and killed him.
That's a quite old age to have survived to.
How do you know it was the asbestos from the boilers that killed him and not just a roll of the old age dice? Why look to point the blame on someone/thing. No one lives forever.
 

CINERAMAX

400 Club - QQ All-Star
Joined
Jan 12, 2017
Messages
462
Maybe there was a payout. My brother in law worked for a manufacturer that settled for billions in one of those class actions.
 

Owen Smith

701 Club - QQ All-Star
Joined
Apr 6, 2012
Messages
732
Location
UK
That's a quite old age to have survived to.
How do you know it was the asbestos from the boilers that killed him and not just a roll of the old age dice? Why look to point the blame on someone/thing. No one lives forever.
Mesothelioma is a very rare lung cancer to get for any reason other than asbestos exposure. The doctors were as sure as they can be. When asked how much asbestos was in the air he replied "thick enough it looked like you could cut chunks of it from the air".
 

Owen Smith

701 Club - QQ All-Star
Joined
Apr 6, 2012
Messages
732
Location
UK
Maybe there was a payout. My brother in law worked for a manufacturer that settled for billions in one of those class actions.
The UK compensation scheme has something like a 30 year cutoff between your last exposure to asbestos and you developing mesothelioma. My grandad was a couple of years beyond it. He even had the trade union handling his legal case, he'd kept paying his union subscriptions all the years he was retired.
 

Sal1950

1K Club - QQ Shooting Star
QQ Supporter
Joined
Jan 3, 2020
Messages
1,435
Location
Central FL
The UK compensation scheme has something like a 30 year cutoff between your last exposure to asbestos and you developing mesothelioma. My grandad was a couple of years beyond it. He even had the trade union handling his legal case, he'd kept paying his union subscriptions all the years he was retired.
So he did or didn't win the comp case?
 

fizzywiggs41

2K Club - QQ Super Nova
QQ Supporter
Joined
Feb 15, 2015
Messages
5,804
Location
wpg, mb
The UK compensation scheme has something like a 30 year cutoff between your last exposure to asbestos and you developing mesothelioma. My grandad was a couple of years beyond it. He even had the trade union handling his legal case, he'd kept paying his union subscriptions all the years he was retired.

Yep working with asbestos would be a ticking time bomb when you have it in the lungs .

Sorry to hear about your dad's cancer passing ,Owen .
 

Owen Smith

701 Club - QQ All-Star
Joined
Apr 6, 2012
Messages
732
Location
UK
Yep working with asbestos would be a ticking time bomb when you have it in the lungs .

Sorry to hear about your dad's cancer passing ,Owen .
It was my maternal grandfather. My dad is still in good health at 83, currently he's insulating under the floor in their house in a floor void with only 2 feet of headroom.
 

JeremyG

New member
Joined
Feb 9, 2022
Messages
6
Location
South Wales
Mine seems to recede when I put my hearing aids in. It's a bit like the noise floor is lifted when my ears don't receive any higher frequencies.
Surprisingly, I couldn't tell the difference when rotating the treble control in the car the other day but I can still enjoy music. Perhaps even more so as I find I listen more to the music and less to "the system" Decided to go for quad to put something back in though.
 

newslane

Senior Member
QQ Supporter
Joined
Jul 1, 2019
Messages
218
Location
Santa Fe, NM USA
I got it during my mining days. It ruined my ability to listened to music and that was sad, and its constant presence annoying company! But, I slowly started working on it and tried to understand it. It came down to a few things. Food, Sleep and Stress. The first two are easy. After a very good sleep, my tinnitus vanished for even a couple of days. Food was mostly trail and error. The stress was the hardest. I needed to understand those matters that stressed me, and learned to change my perspective on it. That took about 5 years of adapting and reconfiguring how my thought processes operated. I still have it today, it comes and goes, but does not bother me anymore. My 2 cents.
Your comment about stress is right on target.
 
Top