Quadraphonic Reel to Reel tapes

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dsk3331/disc rider

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Madison, Ms
Realizing these are scarce/expensive, I was wondering if anyone has insight into where I might be able to locate true Q4 Quad reel to reel tapes?
 
Joined
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Messages
1,498
Location
New Zealand . Waitakere
Hi. dsk3331/disc
I am a big collector of Q4 Reels and I am helping other people toward ( eBay and jauce Auctions ) to purchase them when I am not bidding on them.
The only thing is the desirable Q4 tapes are more hard to get, than easy listening type music and your going to have to make up your mind to pay for them, they are generally a lot dearer to buy , and it`s a waiting game too sometimes its months or weeks when they appear.

Go to this link...…..( What's the Latest QUAD TAPE Added to Your Pile? Q8, Q4 )
This was from the Japanese Auction sit ( jauce ) This sit operates different to eBay and you can come across rare item here.
As I have said its a big waiting game and a big wallet …..
 

quicksrt

2K Club - QQ Super Nova
Since 2002/2003
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Surf City, CA
When Quad reel to reel content gets a nice release on SACD like AF and DV have done, does it make?:

1. The Q4 then appears more often for sale, but prices remain the same
2. The Q4 then appears more often for sale, and drops somewhat in price
3. The Q4 appears for sale at the same rate and price it always has, no difference
4. All of the above three factors come into play, but it really depends on the artist / title
 
Joined
Dec 6, 2010
Messages
1,498
Location
New Zealand . Waitakere
When Quad reel to reel content gets a nice release on SACD like AF and DV have done, does it make?:

1. The Q4 then appears more often for sale, but prices remain the same
2. The Q4 then appears more often for sale, and drops somewhat in price
3. The Q4 appears for sale at the same rate and price it always has, no difference
4. All of the above three factors come into play, but it really depends on the artist / title
I agree totally to no. 4 But I am a vintage collector as well...
BBQ.....
 

Q-Eight

2K Club - QQ Super Nova
Since 2002/2003
Joined
Sep 30, 2003
Messages
3,531
Location
Castlegar, BC, Canada
I have to say that I was quite shocked when a Best of The Doors Q4 recently topped $200 US. I guess a few guys must`ve got into a bidding war. Quad Reel is not the easiest way to get discrete Quad - it`s quite expensive and complicated - but also, the Audio Fidelity SACD blows it out of the water in terms of quality. I was hoping to snag it cheap but the price skyrocketted the last couple minutes.

But I have noticed that some other titles have really dropped in price lately. I have seven Enoch Light reels that, I don`t think I`ve paid more than $50 for any of them. The most I`ve paid was for a super mint Jerry Reed`s Lord Mr. Ford and I paid $125. Oddly enough, I had owned this tape before about 10 years ago and has sold it for..... $125.
 

quicksrt

2K Club - QQ Super Nova
Since 2002/2003
Joined
Jul 5, 2002
Messages
2,840
Location
Surf City, CA
I have to say that I was quite shocked when a Best of The Doors Q4 recently topped $200 US. I guess a few guys must`ve got into a bidding war. Quad Reel is not the easiest way to get discrete Quad - it`s quite expensive and complicated - but also, the Audio Fidelity SACD blows it out of the water in terms of quality. I was hoping to snag it cheap but the price skyrocketted the last couple minutes.

But I have noticed that some other titles have really dropped in price lately. I have seven Enoch Light reels that, I don`t think I`ve paid more than $50 for any of them. The most I`ve paid was for a super mint Jerry Reed`s Lord Mr. Ford and I paid $125. Oddly enough, I had owned this tape before about 10 years ago and has sold it for..... $125.
I can imagine someone following Q4 prices for many years, taking notes and then bidding (what they think is) accordingly on the Doors... but never noticing and nobody told them there there is (more recently) not only a SACD out of said quad mix, but a BluRay disc as well.
The most I`ve paid was for a super mint Jerry Reed`s Lord Mr. Ford and I paid $125. Oddly enough, I had owned this tape before about 10 years ago and has sold it for..... $125.
The Jerry Reed is one of my favorite Q4s that remains unissued on modern disc. But R2R tapes seem to be duplicated so well, that the common conversion to DVD is a TKO. Same with the Bette Midler, so nice on Q4 that I can relax with the idea that there are many more other more important titles, titles that did not get a Quad Reel to Reel release (only on Q8 or LP) and therefor are personally more pressing concerns.

If $125 was the most you've paid for a Q4 then (I'd think) you've done really well and know your sport of the bidding trigger, and sniper firing shot really well there. I figured you would have topped $175 once in a while, like for a Japan Carpenters, Sabbath Paranoid, ZZ Top, or a Tull (before deluxe box set issued).
But I have noticed that some other titles have really dropped in price lately. I have seven Enoch Light reels that, I don`t think I`ve paid more than $50 for any of them.
Oh, I would have expected the EZ Listening stuff to have fallen well below $50 a pop by this time, $16 - $25 even. And it's not because it's not interesting quad, or changing of the times. I would expect prices to drop because the listening audience being limited means that those folks eventually get those reels, and no longer need them. Also some buy them up only to back'm up digitally, and then flip them and get their money back. After a good decade or two of that process, the non-keepers will reappear. The exceptions are the still sealed boxes with Wollco or F.W. Woolworth price stickers on them or special mark-down $2.98 cutout type pricing +sealed - which can be really nice to come across so long as it is known as a tape stock not prone to being dried out flakes, or screechy players - once anyone tries to thread it up.
 
Last edited:

dsk3331/disc rider

Well-known Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2019
Messages
110
Location
Madison, Ms
Hi. dsk3331/disc
I am a big collector of Q4 Reels and I am helping other people toward ( eBay and jauce Auctions ) to purchase them when I am not bidding on them.
The only thing is the desirable Q4 tapes are more hard to get, than easy listening type music and your going to have to make up your mind to pay for them, they are generally a lot dearer to buy , and it`s a waiting game too sometimes its months or weeks when they appear.

Go to this link...…..( What's the Latest QUAD TAPE Added to Your Pile? Q8, Q4 )
This was from the Japanese Auction sit ( jauce ) This sit operates different to eBay and you can come across rare item here.
As I have said its a big waiting game and a big wallet …..
Besides the eBay and jauce Auctions , can you recommend any other sources for me to connect with in my pursuit of collecting Q4 Quad reel to reel tapes? Thanks
 
Joined
Dec 6, 2010
Messages
1,498
Location
New Zealand . Waitakere
Besides the eBay and jauce Auctions , can you recommend any other sources for me to connect with in my pursuit of collecting Q4 Quad reel to reel tapes? Thanks
Well the other places you can look is (quadraphonic reel to reel tape music | Discogs ) you could pick something up there.
Same thing constant browsing, all takes time...
The other is Amazon you may find something there but not that great...
 
Last edited:

quicksrt

2K Club - QQ Super Nova
Since 2002/2003
Joined
Jul 5, 2002
Messages
2,840
Location
Surf City, CA
It can take time to find those certain reels that are either more rare or more in demand or both. But the biggest problem for many is not finding the reel for sale but getting the cash together to fund the purchase(s). I've seen hundreds of Q reels for sale over the years, and I've also seen hundreds being asked for them. As long as disc3331 is prepared to throw down some serious cash, the world is his Q4 collecting oyster.

Many many titles will appear for sale and continue to, as I'd expect some of the original collector folks would be getting out of the hobby, and unloading their stash of tapes.
 

dsk3331/disc rider

Well-known Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2019
Messages
110
Location
Madison, Ms
It can take time to find those certain reels that are either more rare or more in demand or both. But the biggest problem for many is not finding the reel for sale but getting the cash together to fund the purchase(s). I've seen hundreds of Q reels for sale over the years, and I've also seen hundreds being asked for them. As long as disc3331 is prepared to throw down some serious cash, the world is his Q4 collecting oyster.

Many many titles will appear for sale and continue to, as I'd expect some of the original collector folks would be getting out of the hobby, and unloading their stash of tapes.
Thanks for your advice on purchasing Quad reel to reel tapes.
 

M-D-Z

Well-known Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2016
Messages
183
Location
Bronx NYC
Just purchased a quad reel on the bay.

It occurred to me while reading this helpful information that the seller may be one of us, because this very extensive blurb was included in the accompanying description page:

Copied and pasted here below…..


AKAI ATD-74
AKAI 4-TRACK 4-CHANNEL DEMONSTRATION TAPE+

"Let it Be" / "Whistle Version" of this cat number

There’s none of that rock and roll crap here for you crazy kids.

The sound quality is excellent, as you’d expect from a 70s-vintage Akai demo tape and so is the quad presentation, which is restrained, subtle and effective.

The tape is fresh, it’s still flat, supple and shiny. This tape plays from start to finish with no glitches of any sort. The pack on the reel is not perfectly flat.

This tape is wound tail-out on the reel as all quad and 2-track tapes should be.

Please see the photos to check the excellent condition of the box and reel.

Quadraphonic (or Quadrophonic and sometimes Quadrasonic) sound – equivalent to what is now called 4.0 surround sound – uses four audio channels in which speakers are positioned at the four corners of a listening space. The system allows for the reproduction of sound signals that are (wholly or in part) independent of one another.
Four channel quadraphonic surround sound can be used to recreate the highly realistic effect of a three-dimensional live concert hall experience in the home. It can also be used to enhance the listener experience beyond the directional limitations of ordinary two channel stereo sound. Quadraphonic audio was the earliest consumer product in surround sound. Since it was introduced to the public in the early 1970s many thousands of quadraphonic recordings have been made.
Quadraphonic sound was a commercial failure when first introduced due to a variety of technical issues and format incompatibilities. Four channel audio formats can be more expensive to produce than standard two-channel stereo. Playback requires additional speakers and amplifier channels. It may also require specially designed decoding equipment.
The introduction of home cinema products in the 1990s were first intended for movie sound, but also brought multi-channel music reproduction into popularity again. By this time new digitally based formats had been created. Many four channel recordings from the 1970s have been reissued in modern surround sound systems such as Super Audio CD, DTS, Dolby Digital, DVD-Audio and Blue Ray. Multichannel home audio reproduction has experienced a revival since 2000 and new four channel recordings have also been released to the public since this time.
A quadraphonic system will reproduce left front, left rear, right front, and right rear audio signals in each of four separate speakers. Reproduction in the rear speakers should be of the same quality or almost the same quality as the front speakers. Ideally, it is preferred to use four identical speakers.
The first machines used for 4-channel sound recording were analog reel-to-reel tape recorders. These were developed for use by audio engineers in professional studios during the 1950s in Germany by Telefunken and also by Ampex in the United States. Such machines appeared in some European studios by 1954, an early example was the tape part of Karlheinz Stockhausen's piece, Kontakte (1958–60). However, while four channel technology was used for this recording in the studio, it was released to the public only in stereo.
Early attempts to reproduce four channel sound for home playback began with audio laboratory engineers in the late 1960s. Producer Thomas Mowrey, initially working at the Eastman School of Music, was one of the pioneers of classical quadraphonic recording. He later made quadraphonic productions for Deutsche Grammophon and other labels in the early 1970s, however many of these were released only as stereo recordings.
A small number of quadraphonic recordings were introduced to the American consumer market by Vanguard Records in June 1969 on reel-to-reel tape. The most popular medium used to market recordings to the public during the 1970s was the vinyl LP phonograph record. Quadraphonic recordings on 8-track tape were also popular in the 1970s, particularly among car-audio enthusiasts.
In the 1970s specialized hardware systems were marketed by major electronic manufacturers to the public for decoding 4-channel recordings. These decoders were often sold as separate electronic components. Decoders were also available as built in features of some audio receivers or amplifiers sold during the 1970s.
Many quadraphonic recordings in the 1970s used "matrix" technologies to encode and decode 4-channels of audio information in a 2-channel medium, usually an LP. The poor decode performance of early matrix formats was the main reason for their disappearance once improved matrix systems arrived. The later matrix systems were based on work by Peter Schreiber. His basic formula utilized 90° phase-shift circuitry to enable enhanced 4-2-4 matrix systems to be developed, of which the two main leaders were Columbia's SQ and Sansui's QS Systems.
With Scheiber and Martin Willcocks, Jim Fosgate developed the Tate II 101 SQ decoder, which produced a very accurate sound field by using gain riding and the Haas effect to mask decoding artifacts. It used custom, hand-assembled and ‑calibrated circuitry with components sorted to 1%, for exact performance. Sansui's QSD-series decoders and QRX-series receivers were very good, even synthesizing left-right stereo into a ⋂ horseshoe topology. However, all these came too late in the game and were too expensive or difficult to procure for public purchase, to rescue matrix quad.
By the early 2000s more sophisticated "discrete" multichannel systems had mostly replaced matrix technologies, while providing a higher level of performance and full channel independence.
Today, software can be used to take the place of hardware decoding. Modern software algorithms are capable of more accurate decoding performance than the earlier hardware technologies.
All of the multichannel audio systems in common use today are digital systems. Digital multichannel audio has been available for the home starting with the introduction of surround sound movies using Dolby Digital and DTS in the 1990s. The most common digital media capable of reproducing surround sound music today are Super Audio CD, DVD, and Blu-ray. All of these are capable of playing high-resolution audio with multiple channels.
The audio mixing process for four channel sound is different than for stereo versions of the same recording. Most studio equipment is designed for stereo only, so specialized multichannel mixing consoles and playback systems must be available.
For classical music, producers have typically preferred an effect where the orchestra appears in stereo in the front channels, but with the natural reverberation or "echo" of the concert hall in front and rear speakers all around the listener. Some live concert recordings of popular music have also been mixed this way. Though done occasionally, it is rare to find classical recordings with placement of primary or solo instruments in the rear channels.
A few classical recordings have been made from a perspective in which the listener appears to be seated in the middle of the orchestra. One example is the 1973 Columbia Masterworks recording of Béla Bartók's Concerto for Orchestra, conducted by Pierre Boulez. The original four channel recording was released on matrix LP and 8-track tape, and reissued on the SACD format by Dutton Vocalion in 2018. Notes supplied with the recording indicate the direction from which each group of instruments can be heard.
Pop, rock and jazz music producers have tended to employ a mixing style with a relatively high degree of musical separation between the four channels. This type of recording may place musical sounds in the rear channels that are of equal importance to the front channels. It can expand on the listener's sense of direction and spaciousness in a way similar to what happened when recording engineers introduced stereo recording. In some four channel recordings sounds move in full rotation around the listener in three dimensional space.
Mixing engineers can also aim for a hybrid effect between styles. While quadraphonic effects have sometimes been considered artificial, musical enjoyment can be dramatically enhanced by more fully involving the listener.

  • Q4/quadraphonic reel to reel (1969)
  • Quad-8 (Q8)/ quadraphonic 8-track (1970)

Quadraphonic systems based on tape were also introduced, based on new equipment capable of playing four discrete channels. These recordings are all discrete 4-4-4 recordings released in reel-to-reel and 8-track cartridge formats. Specially designed four channel machines were required to play these recordings. They are not compatible with stereo players.
Quadraphonic open reel tape (Q4)
In these systems all four available tracks were recorded on the tape running in the same direction. Pre-recorded four channel reel-to-reel tapes were recorded at 7-1/2 inches per second (IPS), the fastest speed used for consumer grade reel-to-reel machines.
 
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