• QuadraphonicQuad welcomes you and encourages your participation! Treat all members with respect. Please keep all discussions civil, even when you have a strong opinion on a particular topic.

    Do not offer for free, offer for sale, offer for trade, or request copies or files of copyrighted material - no matter how rare or unavailable to the public they might be. We do not condone the illegal sharing of music. There are many places on the internet where you can participate in such transactions, but QuadraphonicQuad is not one of them. We are here to encourage and support new multichannel releases from those companies that still provide them and as such the distribution of illegal copies of recordings is counter-productive to that effort. Any posts of this sort will be deleted without notification.

    Please try to avoid discussions that pit one format against another. Hint for new users: make liberal use of the search facilities here at QuadraphonicQuad. Our message base is an incredibly rich resource of detailed information on virtually all topics pertaining to surround-sound. You will be surprised at what you can find with a little digging!

The worst q8 ever?

Help Support QuadraphonicQuad:

ArmyOfQuad

2K Club - QQ Super Nova
Since 2002/2003
Joined
Apr 22, 2002
Messages
2,014
Location
Attleboro, MA
Why is it, I feel I must own one of these now?

"2 Lp set of uncredited classical, mostly symphonic classical, music in bits & pieces. Side one ends with Bach's "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring" and side two opens with Johann Strauss's "Blue Danube Waltz." Although this is a two Lp set, both sides of each vinyl 12" Lp contain the same program, with no bands to separate the tracks. Sound quality is rechanneled stereo with high/low frequencies split, with a slight amount of echo on the right channel. In effect, this set was marketed as a record album therapy/cure for insomnia; thematically, this album suggests that listening to romantic era symphonic classical music will put its audience to sleep (funny!).

"Dr." Adam Knieste is frequently credited in various anti-rock music books and video documentaries as a "music therapist" professional expert on mental illnesses due to listening to rock music; however, there is no evidence he continued his studies past his education and earned his doctorate in the San Francisco Conservatory in 1947-1950. Knieste was a Catholic church organist and choirmaster in Brooklyn, NY, in the early 1950s, wrote at least two songs (or four) with Bob Jaxon in 1955, which were released on Barclay Records (two 45 singles), then Barclay 1301 was reissued on Cadence 1264 45 single, "Why Does A Woman Cry"/"Ali Baba", about March. Afterwards, he returned to his organist and choirmaster position, relocated to upstate NY a few years later, and then moved to Novato, California in August, 1975. During that time his hobby was volunteering playing for mental patients with his organ. In early 1976 he planned to write an anti-rock book, but never realized it. This 2 Lp classical-music-as-cure-for-insomnia set was his next project, and it was extensively advertised for mail order sale in various newspapers about March 20-23, 1977. Knieste's opinions about eeeevil rock music appeared in various newspaper accounts in 1976, then were resurrected in a Sunday newspaper advertising supplement "magazine," FAMILY WEEKLY, in 1983. The FAMILY WEEKLY column became the source of Knieste's "expert" footnoting references in fundamentalist Christian anti-rock literature and quoted as an academic professional music therapist in Eric Holmberg's video documentary, HELL'S BELLS, in 1989. "

Rechanneled stereo.....rechanneld for quad.....of standard classical material?

Ok....nevermind....don't need this.



 

JonUrban

Forum Curmudgeon
Staff member
Since 2002/2003
Joined
Mar 2, 2002
Messages
15,796
Location
Connecticut
Have you forgotten about these?

 

steelydave

Moderator
Staff member
Since 2002/2003
Joined
Apr 21, 2002
Messages
1,807
Location
Toronto, ON
Stereo in a quad shell, the catalog number is the giveaway - GRT tapes always followed the same format. the first number indicates the type of tape, (8 = stereo 8-track, 7 = quad 8-track, there was another one for reel to reel, etc.), the next three digits (103) were the code for the label, and the part after the hyphen (712) was the actual catalog number of the tape. So if this tape was an actual quad tape it would've been 7103-712, like that other common GRT quad sampler, which is 7101-101.

I suspect the reason this tape is in a quad shell is because GRT was on the verge of bankruptcy and getting out of the quad tape duplication business in 1976 (they'd dumped all their stock by the end of the year) and probably was just using up whatever leftover shells they had in their warehouses.
 
Group builder
Top