VECTOR SCOPE!!!!

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Sonik Wiz

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Dear all

Just came across this magazine back in 1977 when electronics was real and men were men. Inside it is a nice vectorscope project!!!!


View attachment 75188
View attachment 75189

Its the same one we use:

Hop to it guys
Yup. Saw this some decades ago in an AES anthology. Mentioned here:

The Wurlyscope is the desired newer version.
 

par4ken

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I built one of those years ago, just the board (perfboard) not the full project. It was rather cool but to have a real oscilloscope connected to a project box sitting beside your audio system would be much too geeky even for me. I always thought that those purpose built audio scopes were a bit much as well. The Wurlyscope does look rather cool though.
 

gene_stl

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Good old Radio-Electronics magazine!
The magazine that set me on the course of Multi-amplification in 19 and 69.
Norman Crowhurst
The Great Man who set me on my multi amping course. Changed my life. In 1969.
See "Radio-Electronics" March and October 1969.:cool: Easily available online free download.
https://worldradiohistory.com/Archive-Radio-Electronics/60s/1969/Radio-Electronics-1969-03.pdf
https://worldradiohistory.com/Archive-Radio-Electronics/60s/1969/Radio-Electronics-1969-10.pdf
It was a great magazine with lots of great construction articles.

Sonik Wiz had sent me that R-E article.
 
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gene_stl

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People are now making oscilloscope clocks. techmoan just had a video about them. They usually are driven by arduinos or raspberry pi s

I think it would be pretty easy to build one of those clock circuits but instead program the arduino or pi to display various multichannel configurations.



I have enough on my own plate right now but would love to build something like that or better yet buy it from someone else who built it.
 

Sonik Wiz

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People are now making oscilloscope clocks. techmoan just had a video about them. They usually are driven by arduinos or raspberry pi s

I think it would be pretty easy to build one of those clock circuits but instead program the arduino or pi to display various multichannel configurations.



I have enough on my own plate right now but would love to build something like that or better yet buy it from someone else who built it.
I have enough on my anode plate right now too. I see there are some Nixie tubes creeping up on me....
 

Soundfield

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Dear all

Just came across this magazine back in 1977 when electronics was real and men were men. Inside it is a nice vectorscope project!!!!



View attachment 75189

Its the same one we use:

Hop to it guys
The trouble with these types of circuit is that they require the use of a 'scope with an X input. Those were always particularly expensive and almost impossible to find these days!
 

Soundfield

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People are now making oscilloscope clocks. techmoan just had a video about them. They usually are driven by arduinos or raspberry pi s

I think it would be pretty easy to build one of those clock circuits but instead program the arduino or pi to display various multichannel configurations.



I have enough on my own plate right now but would love to build something like that or better yet buy it from someone else who built it.
The character drawing on the Cathode Corner clock is very impressive - very difficult to do accurately without a tv raster.
 

LetsRecapVintageHIFI

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MidiMagic

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The trouble with these types of circuit is that they require the use of a 'scope with an X input. Those were always particularly expensive and almost impossible to find these days!
Not necessarily.

I got both of the scopes that have X inputs quite cheaply. One was an Eico from the 1950s, and the other is a little Heathkit. Both have since failed. (the Eico for lack of tubes, the Heathkit for a gassy CRT upsetting fixed focus bias settings).
 

par4ken

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The trouble with these types of circuit is that they require the use of a 'scope with an X input. Those were always particularly expensive and almost impossible to find these days!
I didn't know that was a rarity. Every scope that I've ever used had a vertical /external input. There are plenty of older scopes for sale cheap, that are good enough for audio. The X-Y feature is handy for checking phase of the all-pass networks of quad decoders as well. Cool watching the circle pattern vary it's shape slightly as you vary the input frequency.
 

Sonik Wiz

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I didn't know that was a rarity. Every scope that I've ever used had a vertical /external input. There are plenty of older scopes for sale cheap, that are good enough for audio. The X-Y feature is handy for checking phase of the all-pass networks of quad decoders as well. Cool watching the circle pattern vary it's shape slightly as you vary the input frequency.
Yep, my ancient Heathkit "Laboratory" scope had X-Y input (but no Z). I purchased it mainly for use in checking phase shift for quad circuits. But actually I used it very little and last time probably 20 years ago....

Today I would choose from a plethora of PC USB o'scopes. Much less than dedicated digital scopes and they do things you could only dream of in the analog days. And cheaper.


The Perytech 2200 would be my purchase choice. Or the 2400 with wider bandwidth. I think I saw it for under $200 new on Ebay. It does Lissajous figures (even tho the trace looks a little chunky) so that means it would do the audio quad scope function.

What I really find clever about the circuit posted by Chucky is the rotational matrix: converting corner signals into front/back, left/right. Or simply X-Y.
 

Soundfield

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I didn't know that was a rarity. Every scope that I've ever used had a vertical /external input. There are plenty of older scopes for sale cheap, that are good enough for audio. The X-Y feature is handy for checking phase of the all-pass networks of quad decoders as well. Cool watching the circle pattern vary it's shape slightly as you vary the input frequency.
Yes, every scope I ever used at work had an X amp - but they were all very expensive. Anything available to the hobbyist in the days that the article above was written would, in the UK at least, still have cost a couple of hundred quid but you wouldn't get an X input for that money. Actually an X input isn't really much use outside of a lab.
 

Sonik Wiz

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The above circuit uses 1/2 wave rectification. I have thought before (but of course not thought it through) that it would be improved useing precision full wave rectification. Me thinks with 1/2 wave you could get level inaccuracy from opposite input phases. And overcome diode threshold.
 

gene_stl

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The above circuit uses 1/2 wave rectification. I have thought before (but of course not thought it through) that it would be improved useing precision full wave rectification. Me thinks with 1/2 wave you could get level inaccuracy from opposite input phases. And overcome diode threshold.
Or precision rectumfication using op amps.
 

par4ken

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Yes, every scope I ever used at work had an X amp - but they were all very expensive. Anything available to the hobbyist in the days that the article above was written would, in the UK at least, still have cost a couple of hundred quid but you wouldn't get an X input for that money. Actually an X input isn't really much use outside of a lab.
I wonder if that old oscilloscope in the early DR. Who episodes had an X input?:alien:
 

Soundfield

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I wonder if that old oscilloscope in the early DR. Who episodes had an X input?:alien:
I don’t recall any Doctor having a scope in the Tardis…




But certainly cheap Sci-Fi TV and film sets were often populated by banks of random scrap test equipment because it looked ‘technical’ and most people wouldn’t know what it all was. The effect was rather spoiled for those of us in the trade when we frequently recognised bits of kit we had used and knew how ancient it was. I often found it amusing when an actor would be fiddling with the knobs of say, an LCR Bridge , whilst supposedly using a sub-space radio transmitter!
 

par4ken

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I don’t recall any Doctor having a scope in the Tardis…




But certainly cheap Sci-Fi TV and film sets were often populated by banks of random scrap test equipment because it looked ‘technical’ and most people wouldn’t know what it all was. The effect was rather spoiled for those of us in the trade when we frequently recognised bits of kit we had used and knew how ancient it was. I often found it amusing when an actor would be fiddling with the knobs of say, an LCR Bridge , whilst supposedly using a sub-space radio transmitter!
Yes in some of the very first episodes of the original series, with the very old looking Doctor. The scope was sitting on a shelf, with a sine wave on the display. That would of been considered very high tech in the early sixties. Even some of the equipment in the first Star Trek series was made from what to me are obvious Hammond steel boxes with jeweled lights and regular toggle switches. You could get away with pretending anything electronic was anything else back then!
 
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