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Sonik Wiz

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That's a digital screen It holds the color give to the pixel until another color is given to that pixel. The cat CAN see that.

It was the original analog TV these animals could not see an image on. Those screens relied on persistence of vision to make the image.
Please see post #144 above. Gotta disagree with you on this point.
 

Soundfield

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That's a digital screen It holds the color give to the pixel until another color is given to that pixel. The cat CAN see that.

It was the original analog TV these animals could not see an image on. Those screens relied on persistence of vision to make the image.
Nope. Any visual moving image display, be it cine film, analogue tv or digital tv is a trick (as there are no moving images being displayed) that only works because of the persistence of vision of the viewer. Where the repetition rate of the system is less than the persistence of vision, the viewer will start to perceive flicker and ultimately, individual still images.
 

soesbeout

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I agree, the TV my cat chased footballs on was the 35" Mitsubishi CRT.
One of the last large CRTs of the times.
I had a Mitsubishi also it was the largest maker at that time and I believe they made them for the other brands also.
 

Sal1950

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I had a Mitsubishi also it was the largest maker at that time and I believe they made them for the other brands also.
AFAIR Mitsu was making 35s and 40s. IMHO it was the best TV on the market in its day, a gorgeous picture from a quality source.
I bout cried when that set died after a very long run. Talked to a local repair guy who said it was probably a capacitor (he had worked on them before) but discouraged me from fixing it due to estimated costs. :( I really loved this set, beautiful oak cabinet with room below for VCR, etc.. But man it was heavy!
1591049466588.jpeg
 

JonUrban

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I had a Mitsubishi 35" that I bought at Newmark & Lewis around 1999. I remember that year because I bought it to watch UConn win the National Championship (MBB) which was quite astonishing at the time.

Sadly, both the TV and Newmark & Lewis are long gone, along with UConn Men's Championships! :)
 

Soundfield

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The last CRT TV I bought was the largest (36") widescreen set Panasonic ever sold in Europe. Since I never throw anything away (!) I still have the brochure:
Panasonic TX-W36D3DP.jpg


and the receipt that tells me that I bought it in Jan 1998 for the not inconsiderable sum of £2300!
It had a superb picture and digital processing that increased the frame rate to 100Hz that added a remarkable solidity to the images.
It was money well spent as it worked faultlessly for 17 years! I kept it for so long because-
(a) the picture was so good
(b) I couldn't shift the bloody thing as it weighed over 65Kg!!!
 

Scott65

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...

And one also wonders how many $150~200 million budgeted movies will continue to be made if this trend continues....or perhaps we may return to more modest budgeted films which actually tell a story rather than rely on uber expensive CGI effects to do the same.
I'm all for this. Recently I have been purchasing blu rays of 70's movies for their plots and atmosphere.
 

MidiMagic

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Nope. Any visual moving image display, be it cine film, analogue tv or digital tv is a trick (as there are no moving images being displayed) that only works because of the persistence of vision of the viewer. Where the repetition rate of the system is less than the persistence of vision, the viewer will start to perceive flicker and ultimately, individual still images.
The difference is how long the pixel stays on the screen.

With the analog TV, each pixel flashes once for each frame and then is gone. The screen is dark between the pixel flashes because the electron beam is elsewhere. The TV has no memory of previous pixel values. The cat sees a line or a band of flashing pixels moving down the screen.

With a digital screen, each pixel retains its lit value until the new pixel replaces it. The TV has memory that holds all of the pixel values. The cat can actually see the image because the pixels do not go dark between scans.

You can see the difference if the signal is suddenly interrupted. The analog TV turns white (the analog pixels flash white when nothing says to do otherwise). The digital TV continues to display the last frame transmitted because it is still in memory (in some cases, the electronics detect the signal absence and outputs a loss of signal message instead).
 

Soundfield

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The difference is how long the pixel stays on the screen.

With the analog TV, each pixel flashes once for each frame and then is gone. The screen is dark between the pixel flashes because the electron beam is elsewhere. The TV has no memory of previous pixel values. The cat sees a line or a band of flashing pixels moving down the screen.
Nope, that's not true either. The pixels on a CRT are constructed from phoshor dots that continue to radiate after being stimulated by the electron beam for a specific decay time. The reason that we (or indeed cats) don't in fact see the flashes you speak of is that they are smeared out in time by the decay characteristics of the phosphor. This represents the 'memory you claim an analogue display does not have.
 

François

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You need a camera with a frame rate of 380000 frames per second to be able to see a line on a CRT TV being drawn. Cat’s eyes doesn’t work at 380000fps!

You didn’t watch the video that I posted on this thread a few days ago, did you?
 

MidiMagic

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Cat eyes just have to work faster than a 30Hz field rate to see the moving scan lines instead of an image. The cat does not see the horizontal drawing of each line, but only the vertical motion of a band of light. Each line takes 1/17570 second to appear and about 1/8000 second to fade out.

We used to use the raster scan of analog TV to calibrate photography camera shutters. The phosphor persistence was usually quite short, decaying to half brightness only one or two lines after the scan line actually passed - about 1/8000 second. Otherwise this trick would not have worked.

Human eyes can see individual frames below 10 f/s (frame rate), scan line motion below 15 f/s, motion pictures correctly at 24 f/s and scanning rasters correctly above 30 f/s.
 

atrocity

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At one moment in time there was an RCA 30 in CRT 16:9 TV. I found so cool.
Speaking of obsolete formats and RCA, I finally watched all 5 parts of Technology Connections' series on the CED. He went into a lot of the history of RCA and their record of successful innovation (you know, little things like color TV!) as well as how much corporate politics influenced what did or didn't make it to market.

I don't think I previously fully realized the magnitude of what was lost when RCA died.
 

soesbeout

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There was a class action lawsuit involving price fixing by CRT manufacturing companies about 2 years ago my wife filled out some paperwork asking how many we owned ect,we got a settlement check for about $400 about a year later.http://www.oregonscreensettlement.com/
 
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