Windows 11 is out today. Is there any reason for QQers to upgrade from Windows 10?

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boondocks

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I think the last DOS was 6 unless you want to include Win 95-98 which was built on DOS. I'm a little foggy on that anymore. But obviously I was being sarcastic about wanting to use that anymore. Although it does impress the young'uns when I break out the CMD box and blast through a search or other magic they've never seen before. It makes me look like a shaman.
Ah. What I meant was the last DOS built with machine language before they started coding it in C.
Pretty sure it was 3.0/3.1 but it's been many years now. Was peppier before they went to to C.
I never got the whole machine language bit very well, although I had PowerBasic or some such that would let you insert some code inline with the basic stuff. I used other peoples code for speed up; the PowerBasic I won on AOL for answering questions about programming BASIC. Man that seems like a century ago. AOL, Compuserve and some really really slow graphic interface online service I can't remember the name of was about it except for BB. Course anything graphic on a dialup WATTS line was not gonna move fast. I mostly stuck to Compuserve.
 

Owen Smith

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Don't get hung up on stuff being written in machine language. I write in both C and machine language at work and it is ten times harder to write code in machine language, especially if you want it reliable and maintainable. All your brain power in assembler (aka machine language) is taken up thinking about minutia (what is in each register etc) that you can't mentally hold the big picture of what the rest of the system is doing in your head.

C is a surprisingly thin layer on top of machine language. I have often had slow code, looked at what the C compiler has generated and found that I could save one or two cycles here and there, but that's all and generally the compiler has done a pretty decent job. The inefficiencies usually lie elsewhere in my (or someone else's) code.
 

boondocks

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Don't get hung up on stuff being written in machine language. I write in both C and machine language at work and it is ten times harder to write code in machine language, especially if you want it reliable and maintainable. All your brain power in assembler (aka machine language) is taken up thinking about minutia (what is in each register etc) that you can't mentally hold the big picture of what the rest of the system is doing in your head.

C is a surprisingly thin layer on top of machine language. I have often had slow code, looked at what the C compiler has generated and found that I could save one or two cycles here and there, but that's all and generally the compiler has done a pretty decent job. The inefficiencies usually lie elsewhere in my (or someone else's) code.
Yeah. I know, but in the end it's the one programming that pulls it together. Assembly was never my cuppa, but I knew someone that was very good in it and C, C#, etc. Pascal as well I think. But that's not me. I used to ask him why he didn't do it full time and he always just said he was too lazy to work for a living. He did manage to teach me some C, although I never took it very far.
 

pherbert

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All I know is I was a nuts and bolts guy. I knew my way around several operating systems, I could program some JCL but once you got into C, Cobol, Java, and the rest it just made my head spin. Hats off to those who are good at it.
 
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Guy Robinson

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The last really good OS Microsoft shipped was DOS 3.1
I'd rather be watching football on my circa 1987 32" Sony Trinitron in SD than this crappy 65" 4k TV
I've never had a better driving, more reliable car than my primer grey '65 Ford Galaxy 500 with three on the tree and four bald bias-ply tires

I've been a computer nerd since the late 80's and a professional IT guy since 1996. Microsoft has done something Apple would never have tried, making an OS that has worked on billions of PCs with a trillion possible 3rd party hardware combinations while commanding 90% of the market for 40 years. Yeah, they've had some clunkers, but Windows 10 has been an enormous success for six years. In my work life I cringe when I have to touch some legacy under-powered Windows 7 machine goobered up with eleven years of software arteriosclerosis. Computer years are like dog years.
I'm upgrading a couple of PCs to 11 today. The security enhancements alone make it a long-term no-brainer. But I'll be doing a disk image first.
Very funny on your first 3 lines. I as well have been in IT since the early 80's. I have done pretty much everything in that realm. In no particular order; Computer Operator, Developer (4 different computer languages including C), Development Manager (3 different companies), Project Manager, Systems Analyst, Business Analyst and Domain Architect Web Design. I echo your sentiments on Windows 10. Having said that I will not be upgrading to Windows 11 until I get a new computer. My current one is running an i7 processor with lots of RAM and an SSD and it does everything that I want it to. I usually build my own PC's. I would need to put a TPM module in the current one (the slot is there in the motherboard) but I just don't think that it is worth it when Windows 10 is running so well. I will wait until support is withdrawn then I will buy or built a new computer with Windows 11. By then I will likely need a new one anyway as I have gone as far as I can in upgrading video cards etc given the current capability of the motherboard.
 

boondocks

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I build all my computers as well. So happened to be on an upgrade cycle when Win 11 was announced. Win 10 to Win 11 was honestly one of the least hassle OS upgrades I've ever done. Included all my installed apps pretty much save some ASUS specific hardware stuff that basically reinstalled itself.
 

Ranasakawa

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I used to jump on upgrades of everything, especially O/S's. I 'had to have the latest and greatest' of everything that came out.

NO MORE. There is no way I am leaping into Windows 11. Sorry MS, not this time. I finally have my W10 working as it should and I am NOT going to get involved in new stuff at this point.

Best of luck to those who dare, I am sure it will be an eventuality, but for now, not me!
I foolishly updated my new laptop to Windows 11. It is very difficult to use because they have decided to replace simple things with rediculous new icons and shortcuts which I need to relearn
 

fcormier

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I'll be sticking to Windows 10 as my computers and my family's are too old, except my father's.
Me: FX-6350 (+ Athlon II X2 as secondary computer)
Wife: Pentium G3258 (+ i3-7020U laptop)
Father: Ryzen 3200G (the only one recent enough in the list - to replace an aging Core 2 Duo)
Father's GF: Pentium G4400
In-laws: Athlon II X3

Computers have gotten powerful enough in the last 10 years so if you're not gaming, a computer can last more than 10 years (if you have enough RAM and add an SSD).
 

ArmyOfQuad

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While I will be staying primarily with Windows 10 for the time being, I still do want to familiarize myself with 11. So, I did a little cleanup on my C: drive, took a backup, and gave it a go.

Test run 1 only lasted 5 minutes before I got all I need for now, and rolled it back to 10.

Moving all the icons to the middle of the taskbar is the first noticeable change - which for me doesn't add or remove anything. Ok - center it for some sort of visual appeal - perhaps I can get used to this. Nevermind that the start button and icons have been to the bottom left corner since 1995, we're all used to it there, it has been perfectly functional, and no one ever asked for that to be moved - but at least it isn't like a new version of office that takes the same toolbar menus, and shuffle them all around to make it impossible to do any work without having to look for the same functionalities in different places.

I click the start menu button - and up comes a start menu with pinned items, and recently opened documents. If I want to look at my applications, I have to click a button to change the display to applications. I shouldn't be surprised - the start menu is something that Microsoft keeps trying to change in ways that people don't want and never asked for, so this is just another step in this game Microsoft plays with us. It really does remind me of the Windows 8 start screen. What a disaster that was, click a button to bring up a menu - and THE WHOLE WORLD DISAPPEARS, and this menu comes up with a bunch of tiles, and with nothing useful to you. At least they seem to have given up on the full screen thing - that really was disorienting and jarring - but this start menu feels more like that screen than a useful menu. I hate it!

Whatever - probably can find ways to fix that. After all, I spent years knowing that part of an XP install required setting the display to windows classic, and the start menu to classic menu, to get back to normal. I can start investigating ways to fine tune this to my liking - I know better than to expect Microsoft to build a system that just works right out of the box. So, I go to open an explorer window to look at my drives, and, the screen blinks, the explorer window opens up, and the task bar goes completely blank.

I bring up the task manager, I hit the windows key - no fiddling brought back the task menu. Just a blank bar at the bottom of my screen.

I reboot - task bar is back. I open explorer, task bar is blank. Ok - lets google that.

Yup - it's a known issue. Will need to research it more, but Microsoft has "workarounds" at this time, not a fix. One registry hack later - now when I would open the explorer window, the screen blinks, the taskbar goes blank, new icons slide in from the bottom bringing back the taskbar. Uh - well - that......that looks sloppy. But ok, at least it fixes itself now.

Now then - lets look at some wallpaper. I right click on a blank part of the desktop - screen blanks, no menu loads.

Ok. I'm done! Rolled it back to 10.


Now, I don't know if this is hardware specific, but I have fairly decent hardware bought within the last year brand new. Perhaps it's an upgrade thing - generally I do clean installs rather than upgrade installs, and every system migration I've done professionally I've always found a ton of reasons not to do in place upgrades, and the convenience of in place upgrades is outweighed by the multitude of problems I'd have to deal with, and it always lands on it being a far better option to do new builds, swap machines, than to just roll out an update. Microsoft has yet to get a Windows upgrade right! But, at this point - I don't care what the issue is, took me 5 minutes to see that a straightforward upgrade install gave me 2 major functionality bugs that effected my ability just to get to the damn menus! Say what you will about ME and Vista, at least I could set wallpapers on them!

And then even if it does work - I don't like the changes so far. Microsoft seems unable to take a hint that WE DON'T WANT THEM FUCKING WITH OUR START MENU!!!!


My name for Windows 11? The new Windows 8.
 

Sal1950

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And then even if it does work - I don't like the changes so far. Microsoft seems unable to take a hint that WE DON'T WANT THEM FUCKING WITH OUR START MENU!!!!
AMEN to that, I don't get it.
It's a classic case of some idiot trying to reinvent the wheel.
Except for later adding a lot of useful right click menus to the Win95 layout, they had it just about right way back then.
Glad I've stayed on Linux since around 98-99
 

Owen Smith

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One of the reasons I have stayed on Vista so long is it is the first Microsoft OS to support USB3 (at high speeds), UEFI discs and ExFAT, and the last Microsoft OS with a "Classic" display setting that actually provides one.
 

boondocks

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The taskbar can be moved from the center position. I have mine aligned to the left.
Look, I get it. I stayed on XP way longer than I should have. But 7 and 10 were OK, although I did have a problem with 10 "losing" some HDD's. 11 for me so far has been mostly painless, just trying to get used to things.
Also look around the net. Articles are coming out about the changes, possible workarounds if you can't deal with, etc.
 

boondocks

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One thing I miss about 7 is the ability to customize the ui font, I always used set it to large segoe script but I do always import the xp running horse and barber cursors when setting up 10.
Scroll down to where it says HOW TO CHANGE FONT STYLE ON WINDOWS 11 and see if this works for you.
 

furui_suterioo

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