DTS-CD Sound cards?

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The Quadfather

1K Club - QQ Shooting Star
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Since 2002/2003
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I am looking for a good but inexpensive sound card for doing DTS conversions. I heard the Turtle Beach card was pretty good, but it has only four channels input. Is there a moderately priced six channel (5.1) card that will produce desirable results? If any of y'all are using a card you like, list it here with the price and possibly a link. Thank you,

The Quadfather
 
hi The Quadfather

i'm using the Turtle Beach sound card together with my onboard audio card to do my SACD & DVD-A to DTS transfer, and it works great, but if you still want a 6 or 8 channel sound card, check to see if where you live you have a guitar center last time i checked it was $399 with the RCA control box ???? but i only paid $69 for my Turtle Beach at Frys and save some hard $$$$$$$ thanks Gerardo
 
Yeah, I've looked around a lot and it looks like the Turtle Beach card will be it. Most of the others are pretty pricey, or they only have stereo inputs. I wonder if I could use the built in sound circuits and the Turtle Beach card in tandem to get 6 channels?

The Quadfather
 
Be careful not to jump on the Turtle Beach band wagon too quick! Prices are dropping considerably on Yamaha's DS2416 with AX44 expander. Ebay has some great prices on this combo and the prices continue to fall.

QM
 
I'm a little leary about buying computer cards on Ebay. I'm not saying I wouldn't, but when I buy on Ebay, I can usually count on fixing what's broke, and I have no way to fix computer cards. Most of what I want to convert are quads anyway. I might go for one of those hi dollar cards later, but now I'm sinking dough into the computer upgrade itself, plus a rackmount case.

The Quadfather
 
I'm using the Yamaha stuff QM is refering to, and I am pleased to relay that there are brand new drivers for WinXP available from Yamaha, even though the DSP Factory and AX-44 are no longer in production.

:-jon
 
This card by M-audio is the best deal for sound quality.
But it's a stereo card, so you would need two for Quad and three for 5.1 And yes it is made to work that way. Most sound card are not set up to work with more than one sound card.
 
I own the M-Audio 410 card and love it. Just as good as the Aardvark LX-6 and overall more flexable.

One thing I haven't tried as yet is using the coax I/O to provide 2 more input channels...

I've also got an older 2044 (16 bit max / WIN 9:cool: card to provide 4 more input channels to transfer 8 channel Fostex reels into the PC...

timbre4
 
Found this thread and didn't see any others on this, I'm building a new machine from the ground up and trying to figure out what I need to play my digital music. Lots of SACD and DVD image files, mostly, and other multi-channel audio files. I'll have HDMI out in my graphics card, and it will go directly into my receiver, do I need a sound card at all? Is there any benefit to using the optical out instead of HDMI? Not planning on doing any recording on this, just playback, but I want it to be the best quality possible. Would love to know what some of you with experience in this think...
 
You're already set with HDMI. Get a good software player, lots of choices for whatever system, and enjoy the ride.
Check out if your receiver can handle DSD (=SACD) files, otherwise you need to have a decent Mustang for decoding from DSD to Wav then send it to the HDMI port.
Suggestion: check out the software part first, then build a machine that suits your needs. Even a cheap Odroid N2 with CoreElec + Kodi is ok for that, if you're ok with Kodi as interface.
 
I'm wondering if there is any option for recording 4 or more channels of analog sound digitally these days. Any sound cards that work with any current software? Wonder if anyone can still do quad conversions at home at this stage of the game?

K
 
I'm wondering if there is any option for recording 4 or more channels of analog sound digitally these days. Any sound cards that work with any current software? Wonder if anyone can still do quad conversions at home at this stage of the game?
The Behringer U-Phoria series is probably the best option from a budget standpoint, they're very easy to use in conjunction with Reaper and/or Pro-Tools.
 
I have two Creative Audigy 2 ZS cards I used to use to rip with. Too bad they won't update the software and drivers.
They even came with a software DVDA player.

These days all my pc and audio stuff is interconnected with HDMI. 2 pc's, 2 Oppo's & my AVR, one monitor and one tv.
 
TASCAM, Behringer, and other audio production equipment companies sell such devices.
 
I am looking for a good but inexpensive sound card for doing DTS conversions. I heard the Turtle Beach card was pretty good, but it has only four channels input. Is there a moderately priced six channel (5.1) card that will produce desirable results? If any of y'all are using a card you like, list it here with the price and possibly a link. Thank you,

The Quadfather
So, a PCI connecting audio interface that includes hardware DTS decoding?

There are software DTS decoder solutions available for free.
Getting the dts file into the computer from a disc can be done with (also free) disc ripping apps. A download would obviously already be in file format.

After that, you connect to your audio interface of choice to listen to your media. (Anything from a thunderbolt/HDMI connected AVR to separate audio interface and amps.)

I would avoid a combo interface + hardware decoder PCI card. Such a thing sounds like more of an excuse for 'copy protection gone wild' schemes to shut things off than anything convenient. The DTS decoders are already free. They're even embedded in computer OS. Atmos decoding is the ringer right now. Dolby is simply refusing to license it to software media players (beyond their own $400 offering) in order to strong arm new AVR sales and planned obsolescence.

If you ARE after decoding Atmos with a hardware AVR, that will be HDMI connecting. I don't think there are any PCI card interfaces with Atmos codec decoding. Maybe around 20 years ago there was a stereotype of PCI connecting interfaces being better quality than USB or firewire connecting units. That's no longer the case and you'll find the most options with USB connectivity now. Thunderbolt connecting models are more about low latency for running live audio, FYI.
 
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