Which NAS do list members prefer?

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minimumtumbleweed

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I may be doing something wrong or dumb or may have a switch I haven't noticed set wrong. :rolleyes:
If using PC, I would use MusicBee or foobar2000 for the best audio experience. Heard jRiver is good but never tried it. Now that I've started streaming my music from a different room, Emby has been great (I've mentioned this a few times on this thread already...). VLC, I would leave for video, although I think there are better options for video, such as MPC-HC (specifically clsid's fork which is still actively developed: Releases · clsid2/mpc-hc).
 

fcormier

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I guess then I'm wasting space. I rip all video to MKV. In my experience, nearly everything supports MKV playback as well.

Considering the low price of modern storage, I'm not too worried about the space issue.
My 6 TB drives are 200$CAD and 12 TB drives are 400$CAD and I have four, so it would be 800$ more (considering a ~50% compression). I prefer to spend a little time compressing my videos and have money to buy discs because I still don't have bottomless pockets.
 

fcormier

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Why do you prefer EAC? They both have "Accurate Rip". I do have to admit that I am going to study the file naming details a little bit more. dbpoweamp adds file layers more than EAC in the naming it seems. NAS file naming is something else I would be very curious about how our list membership go about things.

I do have and use a Roku and locating one in the big music room would be easy.
Even if both have AccurateRip, EAC has Secure mode which is more reliable than burst mode.

As for organizing/naming method, it's complicated for me.
Music is on one drive, videos another.
Music is separated in stereo and surround and each are separated according to sources (BD, CD, DVD, DVDA, FLAC, MP3) and originals are separate from the copies (borrowed discs, content downloaded from unofficial sources). Names are always "artist - track number - track name" except when there are multiple artists, then it's "track number - artist - track name".
Videos are separated according to types (movies, concerts, other types of videos and there are subfolders for disc extras).
 

atrocity

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Even if both have AccurateRip, EAC has Secure mode which is more reliable than burst mode.
dBpoweramp and CueRipper do as well.

One big advantage to dBpoweramp is that it's smart: It will rip in burst mode, then automatically go to secure if it doesn't match AccurateRip.

Easy Audio Copy (the non-free version of Exact Audio Copy) will do the same.
 

fcormier

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dBpoweramp and CueRipper do as well.

One big advantage to dBpoweramp is that it's smart: It will rip in burst mode, then automatically go to secure if it doesn't match AccurateRip.

Easy Audio Copy (the non-free version of Exact Audio Copy) will do the same.
Back when I switched to Exact Audio Copy (2005), it was the only one that had secure copy and I haven't looked back since.

And it appears you're right about Easy Audio Copy (it's the first time I hear about this software) since they both have the same contact info.
 

Mackspower

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QNAP (6 Bay - 653A). Super solid, regular updates, release testing is a bit lax but updates happen quick enough for these occasional hiccups not to matter in the scheme of things. Don’t believe the security vulnerability posts in this thread. Even the most cursory research will reveal the root causes were outside QNAP control.

QTS operating system is truely Just-A-Bunch-Of-Disk (JBOD) tolerant. Through just any combo of disks at this unit and it will manage. Three thumbs up, recommended.
 

Stupy

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Finally coming to the party on this thread.

Looks like we are running Synology. A certain acquaintance has a main NAS and backup NAS; I have the backup and it's all Synology.

I am still personally touchy about the NAS idea; because all that data correction cannot save us from fire, electrical catastrophe or theft. The latter two being the bigger risks; we do get decent storms.

So a lot of my personal system is still hard drives- with offsite backup hard drives *shrugs*.
 

Guy Robinson

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Finally coming to the party on this thread.

Looks like we are running Synology. A certain acquaintance has a main NAS and backup NAS; I have the backup and it's all Synology.

I am still personally touchy about the NAS idea; because all that data correction cannot save us from fire, electrical catastrophe or theft. The latter two being the bigger risks; we do get decent storms.

So a lot of my personal system is still hard drives- with offsite backup hard drives *shrugs*.
To me this is the smartest solution. Offsite storage. Every other tactic as you point out is flawed, fancy NAS or not.
 
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jeffmackwood

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I use Sony UBP-X800 and -X800II BD players for streaming from NAS units.

I had used two generations of Seagate NAS units and still use the more recent one (5TB) for streaming video files. (I have an identical 5TB unit sitting empty - to take over when that one eventually fails.) They worked ok for music as well - but there were a few quirks (like the contents of album folders always showed up alphabetically, rather than in track order.) Reliability of the older generation was poor. The more recent generation seems to freeze occasionally during large file transfers. I do have to hand it to Seagate however. Both of my existing units started out with 3TB drives in them. When one of them failed I contacted them to see if I could get a replacement drive. Instead they had me mail both 3TB NAS units to a Canadian service depot and I was sent two brand new 5TB NAS units in exchange. THAT was fantastic customer support!

Earlier this year I bought a two-bay Synology DS220j NAS and loaded it with two 8TB WD Red Plus drives running in JBOD mode. (I don't need the NAS for secure storage; streaming only. So no need to give up net available space by using a RAID configuration.) It now holds all of my music files: 320MP3, FLAC (some multichannel) and DSD64 (pretty much all being ripped from SACDs that have both stereo and multichannel.) Works flawlessly. Tracks appear in proper album order. File copying speed (read and write) is much faster than with the Seagates - and as fast as I need. (Typically 120MB/s over my wired Ethernet network.)

However I did have one really big initial problem: the Sony/Synology combo never recognized DSD files. I posted asking for help on another forum and eventually someone posted the solution that even Synology tech help could not come up with:

Under the Synology Media Server -> DMA compatibility -> Enter custom mime type and add "dsf=audio/dsd,dff=audio/dsd" to the box.

Worked like a charm!

Something else to note, the Sony's manual says that it may not stream DSD files. All of mine do. I was getting the rare buffering issue when doing multichannel wirelessly, but that went away when I switched to wired Ethernet streaming. (There's also no buffering issues when streaming the much more demanding 4k multichannel video via Ethernet.)

I now have every reason to stick with Synology for my future NAS needs - likely when my remaining Seagate units fail.

Jeff
 

marpow

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I have Synology 4 bay 15TB total. Raid enabled. Never a problem not even once.
Heads up, HomerJau said it also think big.
I started with the same Synology NAS which held 8 TB, filled it up in 4 years. So I had to put in 4 new hard drives in each bay. Expensive to do that if you add the cost of the 4 original drives.
I bought 4 new larger hard drives and replaced them one at a time, it took 4 days to replace them all, probably about 12-14 hours each.
To recap, never a problem and think big, it is cheaper in the long run.
 

DuncanS

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I use Sony UBP-X800 and -X800II BD players for streaming from NAS units.

I had used two generations of Seagate NAS units and still use the more recent one (5TB) for streaming video files. (I have an identical 5TB unit sitting empty - to take over when that one eventually fails.) They worked ok for music as well - but there were a few quirks (like the contents of album folders always showed up alphabetically, rather than in track order.) Reliability of the older generation was poor. The more recent generation seems to freeze occasionally during large file transfers. I do have to hand it to Seagate however. Both of my existing units started out with 3TB drives in them. When one of them failed I contacted them to see if I could get a replacement drive. Instead they had me mail both 3TB NAS units to a Canadian service depot and I was sent two brand new 5TB NAS units in exchange. THAT was fantastic customer support!

Earlier this year I bought a two-bay Synology DS220j NAS and loaded it with two 8TB WD Red Plus drives running in JBOD mode. (I don't need the NAS for secure storage; streaming only. So no need to give up net available space by using a RAID configuration.) It now holds all of my music files: 320MP3, FLAC (some multichannel) and DSD64 (pretty much all being ripped from SACDs that have both stereo and multichannel.) Works flawlessly. Tracks appear in proper album order. File copying speed (read and write) is much faster than with the Seagates - and as fast as I need. (Typically 120MB/s over my wired Ethernet network.)

However I did have one really big initial problem: the Sony/Synology combo never recognized DSD files. I posted asking for help on another forum and eventually someone posted the solution that even Synology tech help could not come up with:

Under the Synology Media Server -> DMA compatibility -> Enter custom mime type and add "dsf=audio/dsd,dff=audio/dsd" to the box.

Worked like a charm!

Something else to note, the Sony's manual says that it may not stream DSD files. All of mine do. I was getting the rare buffering issue when doing multichannel wirelessly, but that went away when I switched to wired Ethernet streaming. (There's also no buffering issues when streaming the much more demanding 4k multichannel video via Ethernet.)

I now have every reason to stick with Synology for my future NAS needs - likely when my remaining Seagate units fail.

Jeff
Out of curiosity what do you back-up to? I have more than one NAS.
 

jeffmackwood

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Out of curiosity what do you back-up to? I have more than one NAS.
Multiple external hard drives (8TB and up) - with additional drives stored at a different location and updated regularly. Music files are found on at least three in-house external hard drives, the NAS, and the external location. Video on two external in-house and the external location. Everything else even more so (since docs etc. take up little to no space compared to video and music files.)

I don't use cloud services. Hard drives are relatively inexpensive. It took thousands of hours to rip and curate things over many many years.

Jeff
 

sbrom

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Interesting!

I’m curious about what platform and app you use to control the streaming from your NAS to the Sony BR player.

For example, I use an iPad running MconnectHD, which acts as a DLNA control point between the NAS server and my Sony UBP-X800II renderer. I’m not totally happy with the UI.

thanks,
steve

I use Sony UBP-X800 and -X800II BD players for streaming from NAS units.

I had used two generations of Seagate NAS units and still use the more recent one (5TB) for streaming video files. (I have an identical 5TB unit sitting empty - to take over when that one eventually fails.) They worked ok for music as well - but there were a few quirks (like the contents of album folders always showed up alphabetically, rather than in track order.) Reliability of the older generation was poor. The more recent generation seems to freeze occasionally during large file transfers. I do have to hand it to Seagate however. Both of my existing units started out with 3TB drives in them. When one of them failed I contacted them to see if I could get a replacement drive. Instead they had me mail both 3TB NAS units to a Canadian service depot and I was sent two brand new 5TB NAS units in exchange. THAT was fantastic customer support!

Earlier this year I bought a two-bay Synology DS220j NAS and loaded it with two 8TB WD Red Plus drives running in JBOD mode. (I don't need the NAS for secure storage; streaming only. So no need to give up net available space by using a RAID configuration.) It now holds all of my music files: 320MP3, FLAC (some multichannel) and DSD64 (pretty much all being ripped from SACDs that have both stereo and multichannel.) Works flawlessly. Tracks appear in proper album order. File copying speed (read and write) is much faster than with the Seagates - and as fast as I need. (Typically 120MB/s over my wired Ethernet network.)

However I did have one really big initial problem: the Sony/Synology combo never recognized DSD files. I posted asking for help on another forum and eventually someone posted the solution that even Synology tech help could not come up with:

Under the Synology Media Server -> DMA compatibility -> Enter custom mime type and add "dsf=audio/dsd,dff=audio/dsd" to the box.

Worked like a charm!

Something else to note, the Sony's manual says that it may not stream DSD files. All of mine do. I was getting the rare buffering issue when doing multichannel wirelessly, but that went away when I switched to wired Ethernet streaming. (There's also no buffering issues when streaming the much more demanding 4k multichannel video via Ethernet.)

I now have every reason to stick with Synology for my future NAS needs - likely when my remaining Seagate units fail.

Jeff
 

jeffmackwood

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Interesting!

I’m curious about what platform and app you use to control the streaming from your NAS to the Sony BR player.

For example, I use an iPad running MconnectHD, which acts as a DLNA control point between the NAS server and my Sony UBP-X800II renderer. I’m not totally happy with the UI.

thanks,
steve
DLNA is active on both the Seagate and Synology NAS.

NAS >>> Router >>> Sony

No other physical device(s) in the chain.

Both the Seagate and the Synology are running only the services / packages / apps (they all use different terminology for the same thing) that come with them. Nothing third party like PLEX.

Seagate: "Seagate Media"

Synology: "Audio Station" and "Media Server"

Hope that answers the question.

Jeff

ps. I should have added that there's a good review of the Synology DS220j NAS here. I can't take issue with anything that they say. This is an inexpensive NAS but does everything that I want of it.
 
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gene_stl

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All of the sudden, there are a big bunch of YooHooTooob vids about the Zappiti system from France. The same folks that seem to behind the Reavon player. They have a complete looking "ecosystem" of NAS , Streamers etc, Look very interesting, and feature laden. Their NAS rips Blu Rays automatically apparently which would be an useful feature for some folks. That NAS is $3500 without any drives installed.


Naturally the reviewer like them very well. They don't do Dolby Vision apparently.
 
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