Has anyone here successfully connected an Oppo 203 to a network SMB mount?

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stereoptic

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Has anyone here successfully connected an Oppo 203 to a network SMB mount?

I, and apparently many others according to ye olde internet, have trouble using a user name and password from an Oppo Network option to a network mounted drive.
The same user name and password that works for every other device to connect to it works, but not the Oppo which apparently has been an issue from the very beginning.
Some say that Oppo must used SMB1, I am not sure if that is true. Maybe there is an alternate format for the user name? //server/user name? //sharename? I've tried various permutations, but nothing appears to register. The "unknown user name or password" error is displayed.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.
 
I got my oppo to play from Windows shared folders. If I recall correctly, the issue was not with the server name and password, but rather with the folder name. I was putting in the full folder address, but it accepts just the folder name by itself, without the detailed folder structure. Perhaps try that.
 
I got my oppo to play from Windows shared folders. If I recall correctly, the issue was not with the server name and password, but rather with the folder name. I was putting in the full folder address, but it accepts just the folder name by itself, without the detailed folder structure. Perhaps try that.
Thanks for that. I am connecting to a drive on a Raspberry pi. What was the format you used? username/foldername?
 
For my Jailbroke Oppo 103 I use a NFS server program called haneWin NFS Server to access network shares. You define the shares/mounts inside the program and those become available. Setup is pretty easy but if you use a Anti Virus program (I use ESET) you have to configure certain ports to be allowed through.
Sometimes the Oppo will work with SMB...mostly not.

https://www.hanewin.net/
 
The Oppos indeed require SMB1 and I had to do additional configuration on a couple of Linux-based SMB servers to get everything to work. I’ll look up what I changed and post in a bit (relevant to RPI, probably not doable from Windows but I haven’t tried from there).

NFS is a far easier solution, particularly for an RPI setup. When in UNIX land (both Oppos and RPIs are Linux-based), do UNIX things!
 
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The Oppos indeed require SMB1 and I had to do additional configuration on a couple of Linux-based SMB servers to get everything to work. I’ll look up what I changed and post in a bit (relevant to RPI, probably not doable from Windows but I haven’t tried from there).

NFS is far easier. Particularly for an RPI setup.
My SMB servers are Debian-based (actually Armbian, since they are ARM SBCs), but Ubuntu setup will be similar.

In /etc/samba/smb.conf, in the [global] section, add
client min protocol = NT1
server min protocol = NT1

For easier read-only access as the "guest" user (so no password needed), at the end of smb.conf I added a section to configure SMB access to a particular path:

[tank_stuff]
path = /stuff
browseable = yes
writeable = no
read only = yes
guest ok = yes
directory mask = 0777

Here "[tank_stuff]" is the peculiar style of reference to a ZFS filesystem (i.e., tank/stuff), where I've enabled an SMB-share via a ZFS command and I needed smb.conf to mesh with ZFS internals. For a non-ZFS reference just "[stuff]" would work.
 
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I must admit I primarily use SMB because I got used to setting it up and accessing the shares drives on my PC. So when I moved over to an NAS I didn't find the change to difficult to understand.

It's only more recently that SMB has become a problem due to its security issues and the OPPO not supporting the more secure versions. If it's too difficult to set-up SMB1 networking on a Raspberry Pi for use with my OPPO then I guess I'll have to use NFS instead...
 
I must admit I primarily use SMB because I got used to setting it up and accessing the shares drives on my PC. So when I moved over to an NAS I didn't find the change to difficult to understand.

It's only more recently that SMB has become a problem due to its security issues and the OPPO not supporting the more secure versions. If it's too difficult to set-up SMB1 networking on a Raspberry Pi for use with my OPPO then I guess I'll have to use NFS instead...
I’m pretty sure that just the two “NT1” lines in smb.conf is all you need. There may be a GUI to help with this, but I’m not a GUI guy.

Once SMB1 is enabled, the Oppo will be happy, and your PCs will be happy since more secure SMB protocols are still available and will work. On your private network (I assume protected by a firewall on your router) you don’t really have to worry about outsiders accessing your SMB1 shares.

I’m lazy on the client side and hate typing in usernames and passwords, particularly with a remote on something like the Oppo. Far easier for me to enable “guest” access.
 
Well I know nothing of Apple anything. But the NFS server software might work? You can download a trial copy from my link above.
I’ve got plenty of UNIX-based NFS servers, so no need to go the Windows route for me. Also, I routinely use WSL on my Windows 10 machines (“windows subsystem for Linux”, basically, running Ubuntu Linux inside of Windows) so an easier path for me would be to simply use the Ubuntu NFS server in WSL2.

In Apple-land, on laptops and desktops (OSX) NFS is available and easy, since OSX after all is just a flavor of UNIX. My iTunes (now Apple Music and Apple TV) library is served via NFS from a Linux NAS, although getting an automount of that share working on OSX is not trivial. On iPhones, iPads, and ATV, however, iOS is very much a tightly restricted sandbox, even though a UNIX kernel is used, and I haven’t gone down the NFS path. SMB does work on a couple of apps from Synology.

[As an aside, I used to jailbreak an iPad so that I could get full BlueTooth serial device functionality (so that I could use a PS3 gaming controller to play Pinball Arcade, a really great simulator with all sorts of actual games - licensed in fact - from Williams, Bally, Stern, etc. from the 70s-90s). It’s amazing how close to a full OSX-style laptop a jailbroken iPad approaches. I don’t do that anymore because Apple finally supported an approved BlueTooth controller that works fine, and I moved onto building a full-sized virtual pinball machine to run the same Pinball Arcade software.]
 
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I’ve got plenty of UNIX-based NFS servers, so no need to go the Windows route for me. Also, I routinely use WSL on my Windows 10 machines (“windows subsystem for Linux”, basically, running Ubuntu Linux inside of Windows) so an easier path for me would be to simply use the Ubuntu NFS server in WSL2.

In Apple-land, on laptops and desktops (OSX) NFS is available and easy, since OSX after all is just a flavor of UNIX. My iTunes (now Apple Music and Apple TV) library is served via NFS from a Linux NAS, although getting an automount of that share working on OSX is not trivial. On iPhones, iPads, and ATV, however, iOS is very much a tightly restricted sandbox, even though a UNIX kernel is used, and I haven’t gone down the NFS path. SMB does work on a couple of apps from Synology.

[As an aside, I used to jailbreak an iPad so that I could get full BlueTooth serial device functionality (so that I could use a PS3 gaming controller to play Pinball Arcade, a really great simulator with all sorts of actual games - licensed in fact - from Williams, Bally, Stern, etc. from the 70s-90s). It’s amazing how close to a full OSX-style laptop a jailbroken iPad approaches. I don’t do that anymore because Apple finally supported an approved BlueTooth controller that works fine, and I moved onto building a full-sized virtual pinball machine to run the same Pinball Arcade software.]
Well, alrighty then. :)
 
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