Headless Blu-Ray playback?

QuadraphonicQuad

Help Support QuadraphonicQuad:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.

thebarnman

Well-known Member
QQ Supporter
Joined
Jun 28, 2019
Messages
183
Location
Scottsdale AZ
In the long run I don't know if its better for the TV to use the Screen Off option over
just shutting off the whole TV or not?
I'm so confused. LOL

I think it would be better to use the screen off option due to the fact if you need to look again for a way to navigate or to need something from the screen such as any kind of info you might be wondering about...it's best to simply toggle off and on the screen off option rather than turning off and on your TV. I don't like turning off my TV right after I turn it on. If I do turn on the TV for just a moment (such as I want to quickly check out a scene of something...I let my TV fully warm up (at least 30 minutes) before shutting it off.

Kind of like a light bulb. The only time I see one go out is when I'm turning it on...I've never seen one go out while it's on.
 
This depends on the TV, like it would the light bulb. An LED lightbulb -- matters not at all. Older incandescent bulb? It makes a bit of sense to let it warm, and from a power draw perspective it used a lot of power to come on and overcome resistance so it's just wasteful to turn it on/off frequently. Again, LED bulbs this is not an issue, they have no internal resistance to overcome to function.

Now apply this to the technology operating inside your TV. To answer the question depends on what that tech is. Most LED (and OLED) TVs use fairly robust and energy efficient backlights. They don't operate best at an ideal temp, so not much of an issue turning them on/off. Old CRT and plasma TVs were more power hungry and had fickle components, turning them off/on frequently reduces their lifespan.
 
Kind of like a light bulb. The only time I see one go out is when I'm turning it on...I've never seen one go out while it's on.
That's sort of the way I thought about it.
Many electronics tend to fail at turn-on during the onrush of current and change in temp of components.. When I'm listening to music at night I'll often need to turn the screen on/off to make changes in the source, playlist, whatever.
 
OLED is self-emissive, so there's no backlight at all. "LED" TVs are LED-backlit LCDs.
Sorry, pre coffee posting. Still same underlying point - newer displays don't need to warm up or achieve operating temps, so on/off cycles are minimally impactful on longevity.
 
Last edited:
That's sort of the way I thought about it.
Many electronics tend to fail at turn-on during the onrush of current and change in temp of components.. When I'm listening to music at night I'll often need to turn the screen on/off to make changes in the source, playlist, whatever.
*Some* electronics do, things like desktop computers, air conditioners, microwaves, higher output amps, older electronics, etc. The more power the device draws it's likely they're pulling a significant amount of power initially. All of these things also generate a lot of heat as a by product.

With the trend toward increased efficiency and battery powered dependence, many everyday electronics are requiring less power and generating less heat.
 
You guys, the point I'm trying to make is turning stuff off and on over and over again wears things faster than if just left on even if your not worried about the display there's also electronic involved. Also by turning off the display (while the TV is still on) helps save wear on the electronics and keeps the light source regardless of the type of display; it is used less (as if the TV was actually off.) By the way if it's a bulb...the longer it's on, the more it will change in color temperature which matters if you've spent a lot of money having your set professionally calibrated...same with OLED...the longer the set is on...the sooner it will drift from calibrated settings.

So if you can, just leave the TV on, but if you have the option to turn off the display from the disc's menu system...that's usually the best bet. Then if you need to turn it on for a moment; you won't have to turn on the whole TV just because you needed to check something out for a second.

I've always wanted a miniature display for such things so the TV wouldn't even need to be turned on just to listen to music.
 
You guys, the point I'm trying to make is turning stuff off and on over and over again wears things faster than if just left on even if your not worried about the display there's also electronic involved. Also by turning off the display (while the TV is still on) helps save wear on the electronics and keeps the light source regardless of the type of display; it is used less (as if the TV was actually off.) By the way if it's a bulb...the longer it's on, the more it will change in color temperature which matters if you've spent a lot of money having your set professionally calibrated...same with OLED...the longer the set is on...the sooner it will drift from calibrated settings.
There's nuance to this though, see my prior posts. And some of what you've posted here is... errr... wrong or misconstrued(?). I'm out of patience and time, maybe someone else will take this up.
 
Last edited:
Would a HDMI splitter work for this? You wouldn't have to turn the larger TV on, but I wonder how well the screen size auto adjustment would work or navigating 1080+p on a smallish screen would be.
Expensive AVR have multiple HDMI outputs, but otherwise I think an HDMI splitter could be a solution. But you have to make sure that it is compatible with the latest HDMI specification, especially in regards to HDCP. Same for the small monitor that would be used for surround music blu-rays, it would have to support HDCP if you want to have something displayed! Besides, unfortunately, it seems that cheap and small (< 15") monitors with HDCP aren’t really a thing.
 
Besides, unfortunately, it seems that cheap and small (< 15") monitors with HDCP aren’t really a thing.
This is something I hadn't considered. There's 15" touchscreen monitor options, used in retail and medical, that might work and they aren't super expensive (the touchscreen part would be moot since none of the menus we will be using are compatible the touchscreen inputs(?)). I only know this because I work in the tech field and have needed to deploy and support such things. These are industries where full feature smaller screens are still needed. I do not, however, have any experience deploying touchscreens to control bluray or dvd menus. But the displays themselves should be hdcp since they work with modern operating systems which still need this for media playback/functionality from the computer.
 
I've a 10" Monitor connector to my AVR monitor output, works well with new Denon X8500HA and did as well with the old Pioneer SC-LX86. It the right size screen to see stuff, but not too big to get in the way.
 
Would a HDMI splitter work for this? You wouldn't have to turn the larger TV on, but I wonder how well the screen size auto adjustment would work or navigating 1080+p on a smallish screen would be.
Probably, but I do already have 2 monitors on this PC. Besides my big screen TV there's a regular 32" monitor at the PC station, but I can't view that from the LazyBoy. LOL

So if you can, just leave the TV on, but if you have the option to turn off the display from the disc's menu system...that's usually the best bet. Then if you need to turn it on for a moment; you won't have to turn on the whole TV just because you needed to check something out for a second.
I do fully agree with your thoughts on the matter, there is also the issue of reduced heat with the screen off, and heat is always the #1 enemy to any electronics. When I got this new Samsung 85" the first thing I did was add a couple USB powered fans to keep it cool. Being here in Central FL and trying to keep my power bills down by setting the AC at 81, heat tends to build up in my gear. I can't prove it but I believe it was heat that caused the distortion to my old Sony 75". The vertical streaking in the gray screen background grew worse and worse over time till I had to replace it. I suspect some form of warping or like to the panel is what caused this distortion. My TV is stand mounted so I just have these 2 fans just sitting on the TV stand blowing up behind the panel. With the speed set to Low, the fans are near inaudible from the listening chair. Just keeping some air moving back there can do nothing but good.
https://www.newegg.com/p/1YF-01JK-00022?Item=9SIB7W5GZV4638:(
smearing.jpg


Sorry Mod's Let's get back on-topic here.
I gave The Hurting a 10 in the poll, I've listened to it a number of times now and it's grown on me with each playing. Between the artistic value of the music and the excellent Steven Wilson Atmos mix, it's a fun 42 minutes playing an old friend.
 
I use a 15.5" "Cocopar" 4k monitor along with a simple 2-way HDMI switch for DVD-A/SACD/Blu-Ray Pure Audio menu navigation. I'm not interested in putting additional hours and on-off cycle on the expensive bulbs (a replacement bulb costs more than the little 4k monitor) in our projector... Or having the background drone of the projector's cooling fan obscuring musical detail.

My only issue with the pictured arrangement below is that the viewing distance of the little screen can be too far for these 59 year old eyes at times...
Screen Shot 2023-10-17 at 8.31.02 AM.png
 
Depending upon the player, there may be an app to control it over wifi, so there would be no need for a small monitor or TV connection. That being said, I use the crummy app for my Oppo, but I always have to turn the TV on and then off for the sound to pass through for some reason.
 
I use a 15.5" "Cocopar" 4k monitor along with a simple 2-way HDMI switch for DVD-A/SACD/Blu-Ray Pure Audio menu navigation. I'm not interested in putting additional hours and on-off cycle on the expensive bulbs (a replacement bulb costs more than the little 4k monitor) in our projector... Or having the background drone of the projector's cooling fan obscuring musical detail.

My only issue with the pictured arrangement below is that the viewing distance of the little screen can be too far for these 59 year old eyes at times...
View attachment 97295

I do the exact same thing to avoid putting hours on the projector. An inexpensive monitor is great for music listening (or setup tasks). No noise and unobtrusive. Also works great when listening to content from the Shield. Well worth the expense.
 
Back
Top