How many of the Tull reissues do you own?

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bookofsaturdays

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...which was already released in 'book size' years ago
Yes but for those of us who missed out on the original run it’s wonderful that they’re reissuing it. Copies on Discogs have sold for between 2-300 dollars which of course is outrageous but that’s the reality.

I think it’s great that they’re doing this, for those that want it they can finally get it for a fair price and my hope is that they’ll repress all of them. I’d love to have them for the flat transfers of the original master and other goodies, and they just look incredible on a shelf, not to mention the incredibly detailed and interesting write-up on the respective record, and not being a Tull fan before getting these sets has increased my enjoyment of the music and made me realize how great of a band they are!
 

ssully

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Right, but I *do* have the old TaaB book . Don't need the new book . Don't need any after the 'A' album, and I have all of them up to that point. Hence -- Q: How many Tull reissues do I have? A: Enough, thanks.

If I ever invest in Atmos, and they get remixed again, I'd reconsider.
 
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Simon A

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Great thread!

I spent some time making an exhaustive inventory of all the Jethro Tull sets in my collection and I got a grand total of 0.

They're superb sets for fans of the band, but alas the music is simply not for me.

You're all better off now knowing this about me.
 

JohnN

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All for Tull. :cool:
[IMG]

a time for everything
 

scooob

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I'm not a big fan of This Was.
I didn't know what to make of This Was when I was a teen in the late 70s, and very into Tull from Benefit through Songs From The Wood. I decided it sucked after buying it on vinyl and listening through a couple of times. Decades later, when I got it on CD as part of The Originals import set, I gave it another chance and could understand it better, on its own terms. When the anniversary set came out with the 4.1 surround mix, I gave it more attention and appreciated it a lot, as both the charming baby steps for what Tull would soon develop into, but also just as a document of a really good late-60s British psychedelic blues band, with Ian throwing in a few left-field influences to spice things up and differentiate them from the crowd (Fleetwood Mac, John Mayall, Yardbirds, Stones, etc.). Not just making the flute a prominent lead instrument, but doing the jazzy Roland Kirk cover, adding horns to Move On Alone, and using the mythical "claghorn" instrument they supposedly invented on Dharma For One (clever song title, btw).

I don't listen to it as much as other Tull albums, but when I do put it on, I enjoy it. It's not burned into my memory like most other Tull albums are, so I'm still discovering things each time. And I think Steven Wilson did wonders creating an effective quad-like mix from the 4-track multis he had to work with.
 

~dave~~wave~

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...a document of a really good late-60s British psychedelic blues band, with Ian throwing in a few left-field influences to spice things up and differentiate them from the crowd (Fleetwood Mac, John Mayall, Yardbirds, Stones, etc.). Not just making the flute a prominent lead instrument, but doing the jazzy Roland Kirk cover, adding horns to Move On Alone, and using the mythical "claghorn" instrument they supposedly invented on Dharma For One (clever song title, btw)...

Excellent observation.
Being a certain age, and hearing this record in the contemporary context of Cream, Jeff Beck Group, Peter Green Fleetwood Mac, Mick Taylor Bluesbreakers etc. gives a different perspective and appreciation for how Tull started and evolved.


 

GOS

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I didn't know what to make of This Was when I was a teen in the late 70s, and very into Tull from Benefit through Songs From The Wood. I decided it sucked after buying it on vinyl and listening through a couple of times. Decades later, when I got it on CD as part of The Originals import set, I gave it another chance and could understand it better, on its own terms. When the anniversary set came out with the 4.1 surround mix, I gave it more attention and appreciated it a lot, as both the charming baby steps for what Tull would soon develop into, but also just as a document of a really good late-60s British psychedelic blues band, with Ian throwing in a few left-field influences to spice things up and differentiate them from the crowd (Fleetwood Mac, John Mayall, Yardbirds, Stones, etc.). Not just making the flute a prominent lead instrument, but doing the jazzy Roland Kirk cover, adding horns to Move On Alone, and using the mythical "claghorn" instrument they supposedly invented on Dharma For One (clever song title, btw).

I don't listen to it as much as other Tull albums, but when I do put it on, I enjoy it. It's not burned into my memory like most other Tull albums are, so I'm still discovering things each time. And I think Steven Wilson did wonders creating an effective quad-like mix from the 4-track multis he had to work with.
What you wrote exactly represents my feelings as well. Though, now, I do love the album.
 

DuncanS

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I didn't know what to make of This Was when I was a teen in the late 70s, and very into Tull from Benefit through Songs From The Wood. I decided it sucked after buying it on vinyl and listening through a couple of times. Decades later, when I got it on CD as part of The Originals import set, I gave it another chance and could understand it better, on its own terms. When the anniversary set came out with the 4.1 surround mix, I gave it more attention and appreciated it a lot, as both the charming baby steps for what Tull would soon develop into, but also just as a document of a really good late-60s British psychedelic blues band, with Ian throwing in a few left-field influences to spice things up and differentiate them from the crowd (Fleetwood Mac, John Mayall, Yardbirds, Stones, etc.). Not just making the flute a prominent lead instrument, but doing the jazzy Roland Kirk cover, adding horns to Move On Alone, and using the mythical "claghorn" instrument they supposedly invented on Dharma For One (clever song title, btw).

I don't listen to it as much as other Tull albums, but when I do put it on, I enjoy it. It's not burned into my memory like most other Tull albums are, so I'm still discovering things each time. And I think Steven Wilson did wonders creating an effective quad-like mix from the 4-track multis he had to work with.
Excellent observation.
Being a certain age, and hearing this record in the contemporary context of Cream, Jeff Beck Group, Peter Green Fleetwood Mac, Mick Taylor Bluesbreakers etc. gives a different perspective and appreciation for how Tull started and evolved.



My first intro into Tull was probably Aqualung in '71 (I'd have been 13-14), though I would have heard the more Bluesy Tull prior to this (you'd go to schoolfriend's house and they'd 'borrow' their older brother's/sister's albums), but they probably wouldn't have registered, as they were 'overshadowed' by Cream, Fleetwood Mac, Hendrix, et al we were listening to then. I didn't get This Was until it appeared on CD, but it is a good album - if you like late 60's Blues. If I remember correctly the change of musical direction away from the Blues was why Mick Abrahams the first guitarist left and formed Blodwyn Pig.
 

ar surround

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I have them all, including the Zealot Gene and TAAB-II. I consider the latter a Tull album even though it only has Ian Anderson's name on it. Gotta love Ian's dedication to issuing 5.1 mixes of all of his work, as well as modern stereo remixes that take advantage of newer digital formats with more bandwidth than the old LPs.
 

scooob

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Neither was I... Its been years since I last heard it !
But I think I'll go give it another listen to see if I should get the 50th Anniversary Edition.
It's still available new from Amazon, importCDs, etc., for under $35.

Other anniversary Tull sets still available new include Benefit, Stormwatch and A, for anyone out there who hasn't got 'em yet and doesn't want to regret it later when they're out of print and selling for multiples of the current price.
 

quicksrt

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There was a time not too long ago when he had little time for Tull quad mixes or 5.1. Maybe some form of motivation changed his mind?
It was Steven Wilson's enthusiasm and willing to do the hard parts below normal fee structure. If they had had to hire Bob Clearmountain at his normal rates, they might have been able to do one or two albums and that's about it.
 
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ar surround

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It was Steven Wilson's enthusiasm and willing to do the hard parts below normal fee structure. If they had had to hire Bob Clearmountain at his normal rates, they might have been able to do one of two albums and that's about it.
You've gotta love competition! Thank goodness SW has a passion for this stuff. It really helped our cause.
 
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