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Converting MCH discs 101: Overview

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paligap

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When I try to convert SACD ISO files to FLAC using foobar 2000, I get this message:

1581373918024.png


Is there a way to convert these files to lossless flac using foobar?
 

scottm18

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Is there a way to convert these files to lossless flac using foobar?

Try Xrecode3 instead to extract. Free to try and inexpensive to buy. It also handles some of those...shall we say..."difficult" ISO files you may run across :)www.xrecode.com
 
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HomerJAU

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But still isn’t technically a lossless conversion. Foobar just tells us about it. Xrecode probably doesn’t but it uses the same component to do it I would say.
 

CINERAMAX

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Is there a way to convert these files to lossless flac using foobar?

Try Xrecode3 instead to extract. Free to try and inexpensive to buy. It also handles some of those...shall we say..."difficult" ISO files you may run across :)www.xrecode.com
I have single and super collection edition isos from bd and some dvd-a isos that play on a modded oppo203. Those I have managed to convert to FLAC using dvdae. Sacd Isos and multichannel dsf also play in the oppo. I purchased x-recode3 latest beta to deal with DTS 5.1 cd's, which xrecode3 should read from drive and to deal with MLP dvd audios that will not play from ISO on the oppo.

I get errors on everything except a single Gaucho Stereo Sacd. Which defeats the purpose, cause I am an only multichannel type of guy.;)
 

CINERAMAX

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But still isn’t technically a lossless conversion. Foobar just tells us about it. Xrecode probably doesn’t but it uses the same component to do it I would say.
Oh it tells you about it alright, showing a horizontal bar set at midpoint indicating how much compression it is applying. In this beta version you cannot adjust this compression setting.
 

artwwweb

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HomerJAU - Thank you so much for all your work. Your documentation is very well written - lots of detail and yet, crucially, still clear. Good user manuals are rare. I'm reasonably technical myself but would have struggled through the minefield of different formats and software if it wasn't for your 101s. And MMH is also amazing - you've created so much functionality (and I don't even use it all). Thanks again.
 

boondocks

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I did not read every post, but early on it was mentioned that to mount an .iso you needed a third party program.
Windows 10 (file explorer) will mount .iso files. For example, if you opened either a DVDA disc OR an .iso copied from it with another program, Windows 10 would show you both the AUDIO_TS & VIDEO_TS folders.
Makes it easy if all you want to do is copy either of the folders. The AUDIO_TS folder will have the lossless files, while the VIDEO_TS will have a video spec section with lossy DTS or AC3, or could even be totally empty.
I'm running Windows 10 Pro x64, but I think all flavors of 10 will mount .iso files.
HTH someone.

EDIT: Let me clarify. An SACD .iso file has a different structure than a DVDA .iso, and normally can NOT be opened by mounting in file explorer.
 

artwwweb

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When ripping the audio from a 5.1 Dolby Digital DVD (e.g. with DVDAE), what bit depth should I use?

For DTS, it's always(?) noted as being 24 bit, but I've never seen a bit depth for plain DD. I'm guessing that it's 16, but have always ripped to 24 'just in case'. But am I filling my hard drive pointlessly with extra data that adds nothing to the original sound?

Is there a clear answer anyway? I'd always assumed that ripping the audio was in effect extracting a bit for bit copy of the original (but lossy) audio but maybe that's not the case? Maybe 16 bit will 'probably do' but 24 bit might make it better under some circumstances?
 

boondocks

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When ripping the audio from a 5.1 Dolby Digital DVD (e.g. with DVDAE), what bit depth should I use?

For DTS, it's always(?) noted as being 24 bit, but I've never seen a bit depth for plain DD. I'm guessing that it's 16, but have always ripped to 24 'just in case'. But am I filling my hard drive pointlessly with extra data that adds nothing to the original sound?

Is there a clear answer anyway? I'd always assumed that ripping the audio was in effect extracting a bit for bit copy of the original (but lossy) audio but maybe that's not the case? Maybe 16 bit will 'probably do' but 24 bit might make it better under some circumstances?
My personal opinion is to rip at whatever bit depth it already is. Would it hurt DD to allow the program to change the bit depth from 16 to 24 bit? I suspect nothing you could hear. For a purist approach I would simply rip it as is.
 

artwwweb

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My personal opinion is to rip at whatever bit depth it already is. Would it hurt DD to allow the program to change the bit depth from 16 to 24 bit? I suspect nothing you could hear. For a purist approach I would simply rip it as is.
Thanks. My problem is that I don't know what bit depth it is originally. When I try to rip in DVD Audio Extractor there is an option for the sampling frequency to be kept as per the original, but there is not that option for DD. Unless I'm misunderstanding something. So I have to choose the bit depth with no clue as to what it 'should' be.
 

DuncanS

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I think Dolby Digital either 16-bits/48kHz or 24-bits/48kHz depending on the encoding used when authoring the disc.
 

ssully

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When ripping the audio from a 5.1 Dolby Digital DVD (e.g. with DVDAE), what bit depth should I use?

For DTS, it's always(?) noted as being 24 bit, but I've never seen a bit depth for plain DD. I'm guessing that it's 16, but have always ripped to 24 'just in case'. But am I filling my hard drive pointlessly with extra data that adds nothing to the original sound?

Is there a clear answer anyway? I'd always assumed that ripping the audio was in effect extracting a bit for bit copy of the original (but lossy) audio but maybe that's not the case? Maybe 16 bit will 'probably do' but 24 bit might make it better under some circumstances?
If you are ripping the lossy data *as dts or ac3* files (i.e.,raw data , aka 'Direct Demux") the issue is moot. You get what was encoded.

If you are *decoding* to wav/flac files as you rip (which is what it sounds like you are doing) stick with what the original sample rate and bit depth are (assuming you have a choice). Standard DTS and Dolby audio are 48kHz sample rate, 24 bit. DTS 96/24 is of course 96kHz, 24 bit. If you are very concerned with space you could downsample 96kHz files to 48kHz without likely audible effect. Converting from 24 bit to 16 it will reduce file size too but you have to do it correctly , with dither, or there could be 'truncation' artifacts audible during quiet parts of the audio.
 
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